Institutions of Adult Education

ADHE 328 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignments & Tasks

Unit 1:
  1. Post comments and readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Posting of a self portrait as an adult learner and/or educator
  3. Identify 3 other classmates to form a group for the group assignments
Unit 2:
  1. Post comments and readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Group project proposal due
Unit 3:
  1. Post comments on readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Continue your group project
Unit 4:
  1. Post comments on readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Continue your group project
Unit 5:
  1. Post comments on readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Your group project final submission
  3. Peer group assessment of another’s group project final submission

DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to introduce students to the major contexts of adult education as it relates to a wide range of social institutions including the economy, workplace, the government, community, and the media. It is structured in four units/themes:
  1. The History of Contexts of Adult Education
  2. Theoretical Traditions in Adult Education
  3. Adult Education for Economy, Diversity and Democracy
  4. Technology, Social Media and Adult Education
Through a discussion on the key theoretical traditions in critical adult education, students gain a deep understanding of aboriginal education, feminist pedagogy, social movement education, lifelong learning, environmental adult education, and immigrant and citizenship education. The course closes with a discussion on the relationships between new online technologies, social media, and the future adult education. It raises questions on the impact of technology, participation, learning, democracy, and social change.
Two distinct features of this course are participation and the theory-practice nexus. As we all bring in our rich background and experiences to this course, heavy emphasis will be put on participation, as reflected in the assignments and grades. This course has also been designed with a high level of connection between theory and practice to illustrate the myriad ways in which adult learning is present and practised in diverse facets of our lives.

This online course is an approved elective for the Diploma in Education – Adult Learning and Education.

OUTLINE

Week 1
Lesson 1: History of Contexts of Adult Education
Unit 1: History of Contexts of Adult Education
Rubenson, Kjell. 2010. “Adult Education Overview” in Penelope Peterson, Eva Baker, Barry McGaw, eds., International Encyclopedia of Education. Volume 1, pp. 1-11. Oxford: Elsevier.
Selman, Gordon and Paul Dampier. 1991. “The Canadian Movement in Context” in The Foundations of Adult Education. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Week 2
Lesson 2: Radical and Critical Adult Education
Unit 2: Theoretical Traditions in Adult Education
Elias, J. K. and Merriam, S. B., eds. 2005. “Radical and Critical Adult Education” in Philosophical Foundations of Adult Education, Third Edition, pp. 147-185. Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing.
Freire, Paulo. 1970. “Excerpts from Pedagogy of the Oppressed” in Sharan Merriam, ed. 1995. Selected Writings on Philosophy and Adult Education, pp. 137-146. Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing.
Week 3
Lesson 3: Aboriginal Adult Education, Decolonization and Transformation
Atleo, Marlene. 2013. “The Zone of Canadian Aboriginal Adult Education” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Silver, Jim. 2013. “Aboriginal Adult Education: Combating Poverty and Colonization” in Marlene Atleo, ed., Moving Forward Giving Back: Transformative Aboriginal Adult Education. Halifax: NS: Fernwood Publishing.
Week 4
Lesson 4: Critical Feminist Adult Education
Carpenter, Sara and Mojab, Shahrzad. 2013. “What is ‘Critical’ about Critical Adult Education?” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Hooks, Bell. 1995. “Towards a revolutionary feminist pedagogy” in Sharan Merriam, ed. 1995. Selected Writings on Philosophy and Adult Education, pp. 198-205. Malabar, FL: Krieger Publishing Company.
Week 5
Lesson 5: Social Movement and Community Learning
Hall, Budd. 2006. “Social Movement Learning: Theorizing a Canadian Tradition” in Tara Fenwick, Tom Nesbit, and Bruce Spencer, eds., Contexts of Adult Education. Canadian Perspectives, pp. 230-238. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Harley, Anne. 2012. “’We are Poor, Not Stupid’: Learning from Autonomous Grassroots Social Movements in South Africa” in Budd Hall, Darlene Clover, Jim Crowther, and Eurig Scandrett. 2012. Learning and Education for a Better World: The Role of Social Movements, pp. 3-22. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
Week 6
Lesson 6: Lifelong Learning and Knowledge Economy
Unit 3: Education for Economy, Diversity & Democracy

Rubenson, Kjell. 2002. “Lifelong Learning for All: Challenges and Limitations of Public Policy”. http://casae-aceea.ca/~casae/sites/casae/archives/cnf2002/2002_Papers/rubenson2002w.pdf.

Rubenson, Kjell. 2008. “OECD Education Policy and World Hegemony”. In Rihanne Mahon and Stephen McBride, eds, The OECD and Transnational Governance, pp. 242-259. Vancouver: UBC Press.
Week 7
Lesson 7: Ecojustice and Adult Education
Draper, Dianne and Bruce Mitchell. 2001. “Environmental Justice Considerations in Canada” in The Canadian Geographer 45, No. 1, pp. 93-98.
Walter, Pierre. 2013. “Adult Education and the Environment” in Tom Nesbit, Susan Brigham, Tara Gibb & Nancy Taber (eds.). Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada, pp. 168-177. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Recommended video: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai (53:31 mins.)
Week 8
Lesson 8: Food Sovereignty and Health Democracy.
Coady, Maureen. 2013. “Education for Health and Wellness” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Summer, Jennifer. 2013. “Adult Education and Food: Eating as Praxis” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.

Recommended video: Saskia Sassen. 2016. What is Behind the New Migrations: A Massive Loss of Habitat (54:20 mins.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPlq_ywzrQ4

Week 9
Lesson 9: Immigrant and Citizenship Education
Guo, Shibao. 2013. “Citizenship, Immigration, and Lifelong Learning: Towards Recognitive Justice” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Briones, Leah. 2012. “Rights with Capabilities: A New Paradigm for Social Justice in Migrant Activism” in Studies in Social Justice, Volume 5, Issue 1, 127-143.
Week 10
Lesson 10: The Occupy Movement and the Arab Spring
Unit 4: Technology, Social Media and Adult Education
Calhoun, Craig. 2013. “Occupy Wall Street in Perspective”. The British Journal of Sociology, 64:1, pp. 26-38.

Pedersen, Jennifer and Salib, Monalisa. 2013. “Women of the Arab Spring: A Conversation with Esraa Abdel Fattah and Lina Ben Mhenni”. International Feminist Journal of Politics 15:2, 256-266.

Week 11
Lesson 11:
Adult Education 2.0
Diamond, Larry. 2012. “Liberation Technology” in Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner, eds, Liberation Technology: Social Media and the Struggle for Democracy. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.
Morozov, Evgeny. 2011. “Internet Freedoms and their Consequences: in The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom. New York: Public Affairs.
Week 12
Final Group Presentation
Please note: In the Summer Term, the course is offered over six weeks.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604.822.2013, or toll-free in North America: 1.888.492.1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca

Latest Revision on: March 28, 2017