Online Courses

Online Learning

The Faculty of Education has a long tradition of supporting distance education courses. The flexibility of course delivery has enabled thousands of UBC students to complete their programs and receive degrees. Increased student-student and student-teacher interaction, up-to-date content, and access to the most current references are just a few benefits of online learning.

Our How to Apply & Register page provides detailed information on admissions.

Subject Areas

To find available course sections click the course code to open the UBC Calendar. Online courses are not available in every term and there may be on-campus sections in the calendar, so check the course details to ensure you register in the right section.

Note: Course outlines are subject to change. A full course syllabus will be provided by the instructor at the beginning of each course.

Teaching Adults

ADHE 327 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Student Survey
  • Assignment 1: Individual Assignment
  • Assignment 2: Group Facilitation
  • Assignment 3: Peer Assessment: Quality of Feedback and Average of Peer Grades
  • Assignment 4: Participation

DESCRIPTION

Planning, conducting, and evaluating instruction for adults. Consideration is given to different beliefs and ways of thinking about teaching. (UBC Calendar) There are no prerequisites.
This is an online introductory course that focuses on teaching adults, whether in groups or one-on-one, formal and non-formal contexts. It is about different philosophies or perspectives that inform our teaching. You will consider the different elements that make up a teaching context and how this affects your understanding of your teaching. It is intended to give you a personal framework for teaching and the tools to implement your framework well.
ADHE 327 is a core course in the Diploma in Education – Adult Learning and Education, the Diploma in Education – Health Education, and for a BA Minor in Education, Community, Adult and Higher Education. It is an approved elective course in the Diploma in Education – Teaching English as a Second Language and in several programs in a number of Faculties. Please check with your Faculty or Program Advisor.

OUTLINE

Week  Topic
1 Introduction: Adult Education
2 Adult Learners
3 Contexts of Teaching Adults
4 Teaching Perspectives
5 Transmission Perspective
6 Apprenticeship Perspective
7 Developmental Perspective
8 Nurturing Perspective
9 Social Reform Perspective
10 Teaching Strategies
11 Teaching Ideals: A Teaching Philosophy
12 Assessing Learning and Teaching
Please note: In the Summer Term, the course is offered over six weeks.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-6613889 or
  • Pratt, Daniel D. and Smulders, Dave and Associates.  Five Perspectives on Teaching:  Mapping a Plurality of the Good  Second Edition.  Malabar, FL:  Krieger Publishing Co., 2015.  ISBN:  9781575243191

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca

Institutions of Adult Education

ADHE 328 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignments & Tasks

Unit 1:
  1. Post comments and readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Posting of a self portrait as an adult learner and/or educator
  3. Identify 3 other classmates to form a group for the group assignments
Unit 2:
  1. Post comments and readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Group project proposal due
Unit 3:
  1. Post comments on readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Continue your group project
Unit 4:
  1. Post comments on readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Continue your group project
Unit 5:
  1. Post comments on readings AND reactions to your peers’ postings
  2. Your group project final submission
  3. Peer group assessment of another’s group project final submission

DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to introduce students to the major contexts of adult education as it relates to a wide range of social institutions including the economy, workplace, the government, community, and the media. It is structured in four units/themes:
  1. The History of Contexts of Adult Education
  2. Theoretical Traditions in Adult Education
  3. Adult Education for Economy, Diversity and Democracy
  4. Technology, Social Media and Adult Education
Through a discussion on the key theoretical traditions in critical adult education, students gain a deep understanding of aboriginal education, feminist pedagogy, social movement education, lifelong learning, environmental adult education, and immigrant and citizenship education. The course closes with a discussion on the relationships between new online technologies, social media, and the future adult education. It raises questions on the impact of technology, participation, learning, democracy, and social change.
Two distinct features of this course are participation and the theory-practice nexus. As we all bring in our rich background and experiences to this course, heavy emphasis will be put on participation, as reflected in the assignments and grades. This course has also been designed with a high level of connection between theory and practice to illustrate the myriad ways in which adult learning is present and practised in diverse facets of our lives.

OUTLINE

Week 1
Lesson 1: History of Contexts of Adult Education
Unit 1: History of Contexts of Adult Education
Rubenson, Kjell. 2010. “Adult Education Overview” in Penelope Peterson, Eva Baker, Barry McGaw, eds., International Encyclopedia of Education. Volume 1, pp. 1-11. Oxford: Elsevier.
Selman, Gordon and Paul Dampier. 1991. “The Canadian Movement in Context” in The Foundations of Adult Education. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Week 2
Lesson 2: Radical and Critical Adult Education
Unit 2: Theoretical Traditions in Adult Education
Elias, J. K. and Merriam, S. B., eds. 2005. “Radical and Critical Adult Education” in Philosophical Foundations of Adult Education, Third Edition, pp. 147-185. Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing.
Freire, Paulo. 1970. “Excerpts from Pedagogy of the Oppressed” in Sharan Merriam, ed. 1995. Selected Writings on Philosophy and Adult Education, pp. 137-146. Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing.
Week 3
Lesson 3: Aboriginal Adult Education, Decolonization and Transformation
Atleo, Marlene. 2013. “The Zone of Canadian Aboriginal Adult Education” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Silver, Jim. 2013. “Aboriginal Adult Education: Combating Poverty and Colonization” in Marlene Atleo, ed., Moving Forward Giving Back: Transformative Aboriginal Adult Education. Halifax: NS: Fernwood Publishing.
Week 4
Lesson 4: Critical Feminist Adult Education
Carpenter, Sara and Mojab, Shahrzad. 2013. “What is ‘Critical’ about Critical Adult Education?” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Hooks, Bell. 1995. “Towards a revolutionary feminist pedagogy” in Sharan Merriam, ed. 1995. Selected Writings on Philosophy and Adult Education, pp. 198-205. Malabar, FL: Krieger Publishing Company.
Week 5
Lesson 5: Social Movement and Community Learning
Hall, Budd. 2006. “Social Movement Learning: Theorizing a Canadian Tradition” in Tara Fenwick, Tom Nesbit, and Bruce Spencer, eds., Contexts of Adult Education. Canadian Perspectives, pp. 230-238. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Harley, Anne. 2012. “’We are Poor, Not Stupid’: Learning from Autonomous Grassroots Social Movements in South Africa” in Budd Hall, Darlene Clover, Jim Crowther, and Eurig Scandrett. 2012. Learning and Education for a Better World: The Role of Social Movements, pp. 3-22. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
Week 6
Lesson 6: Lifelong Learning and Knowledge Economy
Unit 3: Education for Economy, Diversity & Democracy

Rubenson, Kjell. 2002. “Lifelong Learning for All: Challenges and Limitations of Public Policy”. http://casae-aceea.ca/~casae/sites/casae/archives/cnf2002/2002_Papers/rubenson2002w.pdf.

Rubenson, Kjell. 2008. “OECD Education Policy and World Hegemony”. In Rihanne Mahon and Stephen McBride, eds, The OECD and Transnational Governance, pp. 242-259. Vancouver: UBC Press.
Week 7
Lesson 7: Ecojustice and Adult Education
Draper, Dianne and Bruce Mitchell. 2001. “Environmental Justice Considerations in Canada” in The Canadian Geographer 45, No. 1, pp. 93-98.
Walter, Pierre. 2013. “Adult Education and the Environment” in Tom Nesbit, Susan Brigham, Tara Gibb & Nancy Taber (eds.). Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada, pp. 168-177. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Recommended video: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai (53:31 mins.)
Week 8
Lesson 8: Food Sovereignty and Health Democracy.
Coady, Maureen. 2013. “Education for Health and Wellness” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Summer, Jennifer. 2013. “Adult Education and Food: Eating as Praxis” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.

Recommended video: Saskia Sassen. 2016. What is Behind the New Migrations: A Massive Loss of Habitat (54:20 mins.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPlq_ywzrQ4

Week 9
Lesson 9: Immigrant and Citizenship Education
Guo, Shibao. 2013. “Citizenship, Immigration, and Lifelong Learning: Towards Recognitive Justice” in Tom Nesbit et al., eds., Building on Critical Traditions: Adult Education and Learning in Canada. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing.
Briones, Leah. 2012. “Rights with Capabilities: A New Paradigm for Social Justice in Migrant Activism” in Studies in Social Justice, Volume 5, Issue 1, 127-143.
Week 10
Lesson 10: The Occupy Movement and the Arab Spring
Unit 4: Technology, Social Media and Adult Education
Calhoun, Craig. 2013. “Occupy Wall Street in Perspective”. The British Journal of Sociology, 64:1, pp. 26-38.

Pedersen, Jennifer and Salib, Monalisa. 2013. “Women of the Arab Spring: A Conversation with Esraa Abdel Fattah and Lina Ben Mhenni”. International Feminist Journal of Politics 15:2, 256-266.

Week 11
Lesson 11:
Adult Education 2.0
Diamond, Larry. 2012. “Liberation Technology” in Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner, eds, Liberation Technology: Social Media and the Struggle for Democracy. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.
Morozov, Evgeny. 2011. “Internet Freedoms and their Consequences: in The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom. New York: Public Affairs.
Week 12
Final Group Presentation
Please note: In the Summer Term, the course is offered over six weeks.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca

Developing Short Courses, Workshops and Seminars

ADHE 329 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

There are four assignments for this online course.

DESCRIPTION

Organization and administration of adult education events such as short courses, seminars, workshops, conferences and institutes. ADHE 329 is a core course in the Diploma in Education – Adult Learning & Education and the Diploma in Education – Health Education.

OBJECTIVES

This online course is designed to help the student acquire the competencies necessary to develop, implement and evaluate short-term, intensive programs for adult learners. When students have completed the course, they should be able to:
  1. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of employing the short-term format in adult education;
  2. Identify the distinctions among various program types which employ the short-term format;
  3. Identify and describe the major steps involved in planning short-term programs;
  4. Develop a written program plan using the program planning process as an organizing framework;
  5. Evaluate a written program to determine its effectiveness and efficiency from both instructional and administrative perspectives;
  6. Recognize program planning components and instructional decisions from your own experience;
  7. Apply program planning strategies to acquire a more informed evaluation of your own learning; and
  8. Develop increased competency in online learning environments.

OUTLINE

Lesson 1 Introduction to Program Planning
Lesson 2 Program Planning Models
Lesson 3 The Format of a Short Program
Lesson 4 Analyze the Planning Context and Learner Community
Lesson 5 Justify and Focus Planning
Lesson 6 Clarify Intentions: Goals and Needs
Lesson 7 Clarify Intentions: Needs and Objectives
Lesson 8 Formulate Instructional Plan: Approaches to Teaching
Lesson 9 Formulate Instructional Plan: Designing Learning
Lesson 10 Formulate Instructional Plan: Designing Teaching
Lesson 11 Formulate Administrative and Evluation Plan
Lesson 12 Consider Evaluation

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx
  • Caffarella, Rosemary S. and Daffron, Sandra Ratcliff. Planning Programs for Adult Learners: A Practical Guide. Third Edition. John Wiley & Sons Canada Ltd., 2013. ISBN: 9780470770375

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca

The Community Practice of Adult Education

ADHE 330 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Self-introduction
  • Weekly Postings/Participation
  • Midway Essay
  • Group Case Study
  • Peer Assessment for group case study
  • Facilitation of one week of class discussions
  • Annotated Bibliography

DESCRIPTION

Community based adult education with particular emphasis on the application of knowledge of the social, economic, cultural and political environment in developing and conducting adult education programs for individuals and groups. (UBC Calendar)
This online course is focused on community-based adult education (CBAE). It emphasizes how the social, economic, cultural and political environments significantly shape the initiation and development of adult education activities geared towards social justice.

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the course, students will be able to:
  • Define the concepts of community and social justice.
  • Appreciate the role of activist adult education in the pursuit of social justice.
  • Appreciate the breadth of adult learning that occurs in the context of community and community development.
  • Understand the key principles and values informing community-based adult education.
  • Acquire some useful pedagogic approaches for CBAE.
  • Develop critical analytic skills in assessing and planning CBAE activities

OUTLINE

There is a great deal of adult learning that occurs in our local communities that is often not recognized. What differentiates CBAE from other forms and sites of adult education is its ‘bottom up’ approach and the extent to which the community initiates, develops, facilitates and evaluates the activities. CBAE is characterized by a significant amount of community control.
Module 1
Participants will be introduced to one another and to the course content, processes, assignments, and overall course objectives.
Students will share some of their experiences and understandings of CBAE and of the notions of community and social justice
Module 2
Focus on different types of adult education, the meaning of community, and how to build a sense of community in an online environment.
Approaches to or purposes of CBAE, principles of CBAE, and community development will also be explored.
We will draw on Brown and Hannis’ book, Community Development in Canada, 2nd ed., as well as some additional articles as the course unfolds.
Module 3
Read several articles in order to explore the different approaches and context of CBAE and the pedagogic orientations, strategies and exercises that can be used when developing or working in CBAE.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or
  • Brown, Jason D. and Hannis, David. Community Development in Canada. Second Edition. Pearson Education Canada Ltd., 2012. ISBN: 9780205754700

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca

An Overview of Adult Education

ADHE 412 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Evaluation of learning in this online course is based on three main learning activities (two topic assignments, the final assignment and participation).
The final grade is calculated based on percentages students assign to each of their activities. The agreement creates an opportunity for the student to decide the relative weight out of 100% that each learning activity will carry in the final grade within certain ranges for each activity. Students may re-negotiate the weightings up until each assignment is submitted.

DESCRIPTION

This online course is an introduction to the theory and practice of adult education and learning in Canada and the world. The course provides foundational knowledge and explores major ideas and issues, including the characteristics of adult learners, lifelong learning, the history, aims of and participation in adult education in various contexts, as well as access and barriers. Links between theory and practice are forged through applying the material to adult education practice, current topics and settings.
ADHE 412 is a core course for the Diploma in Education – Adult Learning and Education and for a BA Minor in Education, Community, Adult and Higher Education.  It is an approved elective for several programs in a number of Faculties. Please check with your Faculty or Program Advisor.
This online course will be of interest to people who facilitate adult learning or practice adult education in a broad array of formal, non-formal and informal settings. In particular it will appeal to community workers, trainers in business and industry, educators working in health-related fields (nutritionists, nurses, kinesiologists, dental hygienists), sports (personal trainers, coaches), teachers of English Language Learners, those contemplating doing or who have done development work overseas, community college employees, school teachers contemplating a career in adult education or anyone thinking of entering a university graduate program in adult education.

OBJECTIVES

  1. Understand the breadth of the field of adult education
  2. Describe and apply key ideas (e.g. lifelong learning; formal, non-formal and informal education and learning)
  3. Grasp the social, cultural, political and economic factors that have and continue to influence adult learning and education
  4. Appreciate how adult learning and education theory and practice inform one another
  5. Critically analyze ideological and philosophical perspectives in adult learning and education and their implications for policy and practice
  6. Explore modes of teaching and learning in relation to culture
  7. Assess concepts and issues related to enrolment in adult education
  8. Recognise the relationship among civic engagement, democracy and adult learning and education
  9. Identify contextual factors, agencies, movements and programs that shape the character of “Canadian” adult education

OUTLINE

  1. An Overview of the Field of Adult Learning and Education
  2. Key Ideas
  3. Canadian Adult Education and its Roots
  4. An Overview of Philosophical Perspectives
  5. Neoliberalism
  6. Critical and Transformative Approaches
  7. Women and Leadership
  8. Indigenous Adult Education in Canada and Around the World
  9. Culture, Teaching and Learning
  10. Enrolment and Barriers
  11. Adult Education and Civic Engagement

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.
There is no textbook required.  All course materials are available within the course.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604.822.2013, or toll-free in North America: 1.888.492.1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca

UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No ADHE course(s) were found for W2017 term.

ADHE Course Waitlists

Due to the demand for our courses we have a waitlist for classes that are full. Please sign up for the waitlist section of the course.
For wait-listed students please note the following:
  1. Please be aware that registration is blocked once courses are full, which prevents everyone from registering. If your registration is blocked, please check to see if the course is full, and then sign up for the waitlist section of the course.
  2. The waitlist works on a priority basis; if seats become available they are given to students who are registered in the following degree programs: (a) ALE MEds/MAs, (b) ADHE Diploma, and (c) CAHE Arts Minor. This is followed by students outside of these degrees by registration date.
  3. Students will be moved into the class automatically as seats become available. Please check the SSC to confirm your registration.
  4. We will be moving in students off the waitlist and into the course once per day. If you see a space available in the course that means we have either not moved in students today, or that someone has dropped the course after we have moved in students and that seat will not be assigned until the next day.
  5. In most cases waitlists will continue to be active and will be monitored up to the last day to withdraw without a W standing for the term. The waitlist will be deleted after this date.
  6. If you have any further questions please contact pro-d.educ@ubc.ca.

Career Counselling

CNPS 363 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Group Discussions Participation
  • 4 Reflection Papers
  • Group Leader Assignment: Researching/Summarizing findings on a group of individuals in a career counseling context (i.e. individual with disabilities, older adults, etc.)
  • Final Project

DESCRIPTION

Critical survey of career counselling theory and practice. (UBC Calendar)

Career counselling is a collaborative process that helps clients to clarify, specify, implement, and adjust to work-related decisions with the aim of assisting individuals in locating a career that is meaningful, productive, and fulfilling. This online course will critically survey career development theories, issues, and practices that have specific applications to career counselling. In order to facilitate practical understanding and integrate theory and practice, this course emphasizes experiential exercises in addition to group discussions and readings. CNPS 363 is a core course in the Guidance Studies Diploma and an approved elective course in the Teacher Librarianship Diploma.

OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, the student will:

  • Understand the evolution of career counselling and changes to today’s world of work.
  • Understand the major theoretical approaches that have guided the practice of career counselling and research.
  • Be familiar with different models of career counselling and interventions, and their application to different client situations in the contexts of the major theoretical approaches.
  • Understand the role of intake and assessment techniques in career counselling including the incorporation of standardized assessment information into practice.
  • Be able to review and understand pertinent research and issues regarding career counselling with particular groups (e.g., adults in transition, multicultural counselling, gay/lesbian/bisexual clients, people with disabilities, etc.).
  • Incorporate knowledge of diversity issues into career counselling practice.

OUTLINE

  1. Overview of Career Counselling
  2. Historical Overview
  3. Trait and Factor Theories
  4. Developmental Theories
  5. Social Learning and Cognitive Theory
  6. Constructionist/Constructivist Theories of Careers
  7. Counselling Relationships and Role of Assessment
  8. Problem Identification and Interventions
  9. Gathering Occupational Information, Consolidation, Decisions, Plans
  10. Counselling with specific populations: men, women, LGBT community
  11. Counselling with specific populations: adolescents, people with disabilities
  12. Counselling with specific populations: multicultural counselling

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Amundson, Norman E., Harris-Bowlsbey, Joann and Niles, Spencer G. Essential Elements of Career Counseling: Processes and Techniques 3rd Edition. Pearson Education Canada Ltd., 2014 ISBN: 9780132850643
  • Amundson, Norman E. and Poehnell, Gray R. Career Pathways Third Edition. Richmond, BC: Ergon Communications, 2004.   ISBN: 978096834550
  • Holland, John L. SDS: Self Directed Search Form R 4th Edition, Canadian Edition: Assessment Booklet, You and Your Career & Occupations Finder. PAR Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. WW-10477-ab; WW10478-ab; WW-10479-ia. Lutz, FL: PAR Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. ISBN: 8810000307755 (WW-10477-ab); 8810000307762 (WW-10478-ab); 8810000307779 (WW-10479-ia)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: CONNECT FROM HOME

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Lastest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Family Education and Consultation

CNPS 364 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Discourse Analysis: Undertake a discourse analysis of a magazine or newspaper article written for parents on a parenting topic.
  • Family System Analysis: View an assigned film and undertake an analysis of the family portrayed in the film.
  • Parent Education Program: Design a parent education program that is intended to enhance the sense of agency and intrinsic motivation of children.
  • Class Participation: Each student is expected to engage in the weekly discussions for this online course.

DESCRIPTION

This online course is designed to provide an examination of current theories and practices in family education and consultation.

OBJECTIVES

  • To understand a broad systems (systems-ecological) perspective on families.
  • To become familiar with current motherhood and fatherhood discourses and their impact on families.
  • To identify the elements of a healthy/functional family.
  • To become familiar with a variety of family issues, including those of culture, gender, and ethnicity.
  • To understand the process of family consultation and learn effective and respectful communication practices.
  • To become aware of issues in family-school relationships.
  • To become familiar with family education programs by developing a family education program.

OUTLINE

  • Definition of family. Family demographics in Canada. Understanding family education and consultation vs. family therapy
  • Introduction to social discourses of motherhood and fatherhood
  • A systems ecological orientation to families. Family strengths. Empowering families. Prevention
  • Parenting and parenting styles
  • Diversity Part I: Emerging family structures: Single parents, stepfamilies, wives as main breadwinners
  • Diversity Part II: Same sex parenting, cross-cultural parenting practices
  • Characteristics of Healthy Families
  • Family Education and Parent Education Programs
  • Communication and Motivation
  • Family Consultation
  • Special Issues in Family Studies: Family Violence
  • Special Issues in Family Studies: Parenting Children with Special Needs
  • Family Consultation in Schools

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Bigner, John J. and Gerhardt, Clara. Parent-Child Relations: An Introduction to Parenting Ninth Edition. Pearson Education Canada Ltd., 2013. ISBN: 9780132853347
  • Horwitz, Erika. Through the Maze of Motherhood: Empowered Mothers Speak. Brunswick Books, 2011. ISBN: 9780986667145

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: CONNECT FROM HOME

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: (604) 822-2013 or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122 or Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca.
Date Modified: March 22, 2017

Introduction to Theories of Counselling

CNPS 365 (3 credits) – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • 3 written assignments
  • Class participation
  • On Campus, paper-based final exam

DESCRIPTION

An overview of selected theories of counselling. (UBC Calendar)

The purpose of this online course is to review the most important contemporary theories of counselling and psychotherapy, focusing on: underlying philosophical assumptions, major concepts, view of personality, the therapeutic process, interventions and outcomes. The current approaches to counselling and psychotherapy selected for this course will also be explored with respect to the relations between theorists and their theories, as well as between counsellors and their clients. Cross-cultural and gender-related aspects will be considered for each of the counselling schools under study.

OBJECTIVES

Students will integrate information from the following sources: the textbook, the online course manual, the supplementary articles assigned to each lesson, and the online class discussions.

Upon the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe the theoretical models underlying the various approaches to counselling.
  • Outline the intervention techniques and practical skills associated with various schools of counselling.
  • Outline the similarities and differences among the various approaches to counselling.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Corey, Gerald. Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy Ninth Edition. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage, 2013. ISBN: 9780840028549

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: CONNECT FROM HOME

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: December 23, 2016


The Role of the Teacher in Guidance

CNPS 426 (6.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Weekly Reflection Postings
  • Book Review
  • Paper: Self-Change Analysis
  • Project: Program Review, Curriculum Development or Intervention Plan

DESCRIPTION

This online course is designed to assist the teacher in understanding and using guidance techniques for day-to-day use in the classroom. The emphasis will be on techniques for working with people towards better self-understanding and better perspectives of alternatives. (UBC Calendar)

The course is comprised of 19 lessons (one week is allowed for Reading Week and to work on assignments). Each lesson will consist of an instructor-based introduction, readings and reflection topics. All lessons will be applicable to classroom implementation, but will allow relevance to students working in other settings as well. Students interact/reflect on readings in virtual class discussions through these reflections. The first term focuses on counselling strategies and development of technique in practical settings. The second half continues to look at current issues in school teaching/counselling.

OUTLINE

Lesson 1 Introduction.  Skill: Self-Awareness
Lesson 2 Skill: Developing Relationships
Lesson 3 Skill: Active Listening
Lesson 4 Skill: Dealing with Anger
Lesson 5 Skill: Responding with Empathy
Lesson 6 Skill: Responding to Content
Lesson 7 Skill: Changing Behaviour 1 – Behavioural Approach
Lesson 8 Skill: Changing Behaviour 2 – Adlerian approach
Lesson 9 Skill: Developing Group Skills
Lesson 10 Guidance Programs (General)
Lesson 11 Guidance in the Classroom
Lesson 12 Guidance in the School – Support Services
Lesson 13 Guidance in the School – Programs
Lesson 14 Special Issues: Special Education
Lesson 15 Special Issues: Situational Factors
Lesson 16 Special Issues: Crisis Management
Lesson 17 Guidance: Working with Parents
Lesson 18 Skill: Developing Behaviour Plans
Lesson 19 Closure

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Young, Mark E. Learning the Art of Helping: Building Blocks and Techniques 5th Edition. Pearson Education Canada Ltd., 2012. ISBN: 9780132627504
  • Individual Style Survey #A001– developed by Dr. Norman Amundson. Edmonton, AB: Psychometrics Canada Ltd., 1990. ISBN: 9780929022031
  • Thomas, Kenneth W. and Kilmann, Ralph H. Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument #4813. Edmonton, AB: Psychometrics Canada Ltd. ISBN: 2810000172027B

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: CONNECT FROM HOME

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Guidance: Planning and Decision Making

CNPS 427 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • 3 written assignments
  • Class participation
  • On Campus, paper-based final exam

DESCRIPTION

This course focuses on the work of the beginning counsellor and guidance worker in assisting clients with educational, vocational, and personal planning and decision-making (UBC Calendar).

The course is designed for students finishing a first or second degree, generally in elementary or secondary education, for those enrolled in a diploma program, for those completing qualifying courses for admission to the Master’s program in counselling psychology, and for teachers seeking a greater understanding of the work of a school counsellor.

OBJECTIVES

Students are expected to complete all the assigned readings, participate actively in the online class discussions, complete and submit the written assignments in time, and write a final paper exam on campus.

Upon the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Describe the role of the counsellor within the educational setting, as part of a comprehensive school guidance program.
  • Describe the role of the counsellor in other settings, including individual and group guidance, as well as working with minorities and special needs clients.
  • Describe important aspects of self-guidance, such as decision-making and planning.
  • Outline the developmental factors involved in the decision-making process.
  • Outline the most important ethical guidelines that guide the profession counselling.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Gladding, Samuel T. and Alderson, Kevin G. Counselling: A Comprehensive Profession Canadian Edition. Pearson Education Canada Ltd., 2012. ISBN: 9780138009892

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: CONNECT FROM HOME

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: December 23, 2016


The Personal and Social Development of the Adult

CNPS 433 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Personal Reflections
  • Quizzes
  • Participation in Unit Discussions

DESCRIPTION

Personal and social adjustment issues for professional counsellors; basic skills necessary for effective group counselling. (UBC Calendar).

This online course is an introduction to personal and social development of the adult. The material is aimed at those currently working, or intending to work, in the helping professions, but is also of general interest. There is an experiential component to this course and students are required to link course material to their own life.

OBJECTIVES

  • Understand theory and research related to the social and personal development of adults.
  • Explain how culture, social roles, interpersonal relationships, work experiences, transitions, and perceptions of meaning influence adult development.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of course concepts by relating them to your own life experiences.

OUTLINE

UNIT TOPIC
1 Introduction to Adult Development
2 Influence of Culture in Adult Development
3 Psychosocial Development of the Adult
4 Personality Development in Adulthood
5 Interpersonal Relationships in Adulthood
6 Career Development and Work-Life Balance
7 Transitions and Stress in Adulthood
8 The Growth of Meaning

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Bjorklund, Barbara R. The Journey of Adulthood Eighth Edition. Pearson Education Canada Ltd., 2014 ISBN : 9780205701285
  • Amundson, Norman E. The Physics of Living. Richmond, BC: Ergon Communications, 2003. ISBN: 97809648434536

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No CNPS course(s) were found for W2017 term.

Introduction to Early Childhood Education and Care

ECED 400 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Weekly reflections and responses to readings

Assignment 2: Observation- rights and responsibilities

Assignment 3: Final paper

DESCRIPTION

This online course will introduce students to contemporary principles related to early learning and care with a particular focus on discovering points of connection between theory, research, policy and professional practice. Through readings, observation, critical reflection and discussion, students will explore perspectives and tensions in early learning and care framed within human rights, ethical practice, governance, advocacy and leadership. Students will learn to identify ways in which these influences connect, combine and affect the daily lives of young children, families, educators and communities in professional early learning and care environments.

OBJECTIVES

  • To become knowledgeable about theoretical influences on early childhood education and care (ECEC)
  • To learn about different types of early learning and care settings
  • To understand the complexity of governance and responsibilities in ECEC in Canada and BC
  • To engage with the notion of ethical practice in ECEC (including children’s rights)
  • To become familiar with modes of leadership and advocacy in ECEC
  • To understand systems and connections in ECEC in Canada and BC
  • To learn to use professional reflection as an effective support for continual growth, learning, and improvement of professional practice as it pertains to early childhood education and care in Canada

OUTLINE

This course will be offered online on Blackboard – Connect. Lessons will be organized according to topics with specific readings and related activities for each topic over the course of one semester.

WEEK TOPICS
1 Perspectives on Early Learning: explores types of ECEC environments, and invites critical examination of the purpose and responsibilities of professional ECEC settings.
2 Theoretical Influences: reviews of significant theoretical perspectives on ECEC with opportunity for reflection on how theory relates to practice.
3 Contemporary Canadian Influences: introduces to the contributions of contemporary Canadians to the field of ECEC.
4 Philosophical Approaches and Practices: investigates some of the current philosophical approaches to ECEC commonly found in Canada (specifically British Columbia), identifies the ways these approaches link to theory, research and social policies.
5 Children as humans with Rights and Responsibilities: introduces the concept of young children’s human rights and highlights respect of these inherent rights within professional practice, explores the ways rights may be supported on a daily basis, and the links between rights and responsibility.
6 Children at Play: reviews the notion of play as a valuable learning process with focus on the features, characteristics, stages and types of play. This is followed by inquiry into the role of the educator in children’s play.
7 Governance and Responsibilities: presents the multiple levels of governance and responsibilities in ECEC with opportunities to identify links and discover connections with theory and research.
8 Systems: introduces the concept of systems with identification of the significant participants in ECEC systems.
9 Connections and Relationships: explores the ways in which children, families, learning communities, larger social communities and the natural world may link as interconnected and supportive systems.
10 Ethical Practice and Decision Making: introduces the BC Early Childhood Educator Code of Ethics that guide professional practice with reflection on how ethical decision making, personal values, and beliefs impact practice.
11 Leadership and Advocacy: initiates discussion surrounding leadership in ECEC, including agents of leadership and advocacy.COURSE REQUIREMENTS
12 The Wrap-Up: A final discussion of the ideas from this course that held particular interest and meaning to each student, how it has influenced their perspectives and how they plan to carry these ideas forward into practice.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Supporting Young Children’s Health and Well-Being in Early Childhood Settings

ECED 401 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1:  Weekly reflections and responses to readings

Assignment 2:  Investigating well-being

Assignment 3:  Final paper/project

DESCRIPTION

This online course introduces students to dimensions of young children’s well-being within the early learning and care context. The course will draw on early learning theory, research and policy to explore the concept of well-being as it applies to young children in early learning and care environments. While informed globally, this course will emphasize and draw on Canadian contributions, with applications specifically to the British Columbia geographic region. Through contemporary readings, observation, critical reflection and discussion, students will explore the notion of well-being within the frame of physical, social and emotional wellness. An opportunity for students to apply the concepts of well-being to their personal experiences invites the creation of meaningful links into professional practice.

OBJECTIVES

  • To learn about the diverse dimensions of well-being in early learning and care settings
  • To understand safety, health, nutrition and responsive environments as critical supports for children’s growth and vital components of rich early learning and care environment
  • To clarify what the role of the educator is in providing safe, healthy spaces for all participants in an early learning and care community
  • To become knowledgeable about respectful responses to cultural, personal and family beliefs of well-being
  • To learn to use professional reflection as an effective support for continual growth, learning and improvement of professional practice as it pertains to children’s health and well-being.

OUTLINE

This course will be offered online on Blackboard – Connect.  Lessons will be organized according to topics with specific readings and related activities for each topic over the course of one semester.

WEEK TOPICS
 1

Perspectives on well-being

Exploration of the notion of well-being; the multiple perspectives of well-being to be considered within an early learning and care setting and the ways in which they interface.

 2 Physical well-being: Nutrition
Examination of the important role of nutrition in well-being and policy support for healthy nutritional practices; exploration of honouring and respecting nutritional preferences/needs and the balancing of preferences within the professional setting.
 3 Physical well-being: Sleep
Acknowledgment of the connection between sleep and well-being; highlighting and exploring perspectives on sleep within early learning and care environments, potential challenges and solutions.
 4 Physical well-being: Illness
Introduction to common childhood illnesses as an important consideration of well-being within early learning and care settings; identifying common childhood illnesses and ways to minimize, prevent and manage illness within an early learning and care environment to encourage the healthy well-being of all participants.
 5 Physical well-being: Movement
Focus on human kinetics as a critical element of well-being, positive growth and learning including investigation into the benefits and challenges of movement inclusion in practice.
 6 Social well-being: Inclusion
Critical and practical examination of inclusion toward identifying:  Who? What? When? Where? and How? Students are invited to discuss, reflect and discover creative ways to honour and respect diverse abilities, ages, cultures, languages, traditions, beliefs and genders while maintaining the dignity of all participants in a professional early learning and care context.
 7 Social well-being: Personal Safety
A close practical view of levels of children’s personal safety; examines the educator’s role and responsibilities in supporting each child’s personal safety.
 8 Social well-being: Safe, rich spaces
Introduction of spaces as safe and healthy supports of well-being, with focus on the indicators of such spaces (indoors and outdoors) and discussion surrounding the challenges and possibilities for the creation of safe, healthy spaces in early learning and care settings.
 9 Emotional well-being: Stress
Recognition of stress as an element of well-being is approached in terms of children, educators and families. Attention is placed on indicators, recognition and the reciprocal interactive effects of stress between these groups; student discussion and reflection surrounds methods to minimize negative stress and support healthy emotional well-being for all participants in the early learning setting.
10 Emotional well-being: Resilience
Extension of the discussion of stress to examine resilience and the ways in which resilience can be supported in early childhood education and care environments.
11 Emotional well-being: Communicating with young children
Review of positive communication techniques will provide the opportunity for students to understand how communications with young children can offer practical supportive links encouraging all dimensions of well-being.
12 Concluding reflections
A final discussion of the ideas from this course that held particular interest and meaning to each student, how it has influenced their perspectives and how they plan to carry these ideas forward into practice.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Education

ECED 405A (3) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Weekly responses to questions about course topics and assigned readings

Assignment 2: Write a learning story and planning learning experiences for young children

Assignment 3: Research paper of an early childhood topic or issue

DESCRIPTION

This online course engages students in exploring a range of theoretical perspectives underpinning learning and teaching in early childhood contexts, focusing on children between 3-8 years.  Historical, philosophical and cultural roots of contemporary early childhood programs will be surveyed. Issues, trends and debates that impact early childhood education will be discussed. Consideration will be given to the pedagogical principles involved in the development of educational experiences for young children including the relationship between the physical, social-emotional, creative, imaginative and intellectual aspects of learning; while paying attention to and valuing the multiple ways in which young children express their ideas, knowledge and understandings of themselves and the world around them. In addition, the course will explore notions of integrated and responsive ECE curricular frameworks which position the teacher as a researcher, who collaborates with children and families to co-construct learning and knowledge.

OBJECTIVES

  • To gain knowledge about the major curriculum approaches and issues in early childhood programs.
  • To define, clarify and examine important concepts relevant to curriculum and instruction in early childhood education.
  • To identify and evaluate underlying theoretical frameworks in early childhood curriculum.
  • To compare and contrast various ECE curriculum models and approaches.
  • To consider how subject areas and developmental domains are addressed in early childhood/primary programs.
  • To integrate information from discussions forums and readings with personal perspectives on classroom practices.
  • To develop curriculum plans for early childhood/primary classrooms based on theory, research and examination of approaches and models of early childhood curricula.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required. Readings are provided online through the Library Course Reserves.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: January 6, 2017


Early Learning Curriculum in the Pre-School Years

ECED 406 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1:  Weekly Responses to Readings
Assignment 2:  Observations of an Early Childhood Environment or an interview with an Early Childhood Educator
Assignment 3:  Final Paper

DESCRIPTION

The development of pre-Kindergarten programs with reference to recent research, theories of early learning, and curriculum trends and practices.

This online course will explore the breadth of research on early childhood pedagogy. This course will introduce students to the link between sociocultural theory and young children’s development, the changing role of the early childhood educator, authentic early childhood environments, the significance of children’s ‘voice’ in curriculum development and classroom design, children’s engagement with changing communication systems, their evolving identities, and the ‘languages’ of assessment and evaluation for young learners.

OBJECTIVES

To develop an understanding of:

  • Early childhood issues and trends
  • Theoretical perspectives influencing early childhood education
  • The role of the educator in early learning contexts
  • Children’s involvement in curriculum development and classroom design
  • Children’s multi-layered identities
  • Evaluation and assessment strategies for young children

OUTLINE

WEEK TOPICS
1

Image of the Child

Examines the evolution of how children have been viewed by society, and provokes reflection on how our past experiences and cultural norms shape our own images of children.

2

Sociocultural Theory: Young Children, their Families and Communities

Provides insight into the flexible webs of relationships and communities that young students are a part of outside of the classroom.

3

Pedagogy of Play

Highlights the different types and stages of play in young children’s worlds.

4

The Negotiated Curriculum and the Evolving Role of the Early Childhood Educator

Provides insight into the concept of the ‘emergent curriculum’ in early childhood classrooms, and the teacher’s role in this collaborative process.

5

Children’s ‘Voices’ in Early Childhood Contexts

Highlights the importance of valuing and respecting children’s ideas, thoughts, and perspective in the early childhood context.

6

Contemporary Childhood: The Influence of Digital Technology & Popular Culture in Children’s Worlds

Examines the significant role digital technology and popular culture narratives play in children’s out-of-school lives, and provokes us to reflect on our own beliefs on the inclusion of digital technology and popular culture in early childhood classrooms.

7

Early Learning Environment

Highlights the notion of co-constructing beautiful and stimulating learning environments with young children.

8

Children’s Multiple Identities

Examines how children’s sense of identity evolves, and explores the significant role ‘imagined communities’ play in young children’s development.

9

Home-School-Community Connections

Discusses the importance of developing meaningful and reciprocal partnerships with students’ families and local community members.

10

Multimodality:  Children as Meaning-Makers

Introduces the concept that children have many layers of representational resources available to them, such as play, movement, song and artistic activity, which enable them to make sense of their world.

11

‘Languages’ of Assessment and Evaluation for Young Children

Explores the different forms of assessment and documentation that can be used in early childhood classrooms.

12

Reflections

A review of the course, with a discussion on the seminal ideas that have resonated with you or transformed your thinking on early childhood education.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: (604) 604-822-2665    Toll free: 1-800-661-3889   or

Order online:  http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Fraser, Susan.  Authentic Childhood: Experiencing Reggio Emilia in the Classroom, Third Canadian Edition. ISBN-10: 0176501363
  • Ebook option: http://www.coursesmart.com/search

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Supporting Early Learning in the Preschool Years

ECED 407 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Weekly Responses to Readings
Assignment 2: Designing an Early Childhood Environment
Assignment 3: Final Paper

DESCRIPTION

Planning and implementing pre-Kindergarten learning experiences: resources, materials, curriculum integration, evaluation, scheduling and classroom design. (UBC Calendar)

This online course will explore the breadth of research on early childhood pedagogy, and examine the importance of recognizing and celebrating young children’s knowledge and expertise in the early childhood context. This course will also delve into the significant role the environment plays in children’s learning, and address the following concepts: indoor and outdoor learning spaces, the incorporation of natural materials in the classroom, the integration of different areas of learning in the early childhood context, and the notion of project-based thinking in preschool settings.

OBJECTIVES

To develop an understanding of:

  • Children as Active Learners
  • Children’s Holistic Development and Learning
  • The Importance of Relationships in Children’s Worlds
  • The Significance of Co-Creating Stimulating and Dynamic Early Childhood Environments with Young Children

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 The Multiple Networks of the Child: examines the different worlds of the child, and explores the role family members, community members, and friends play as influencers and supporters in children’s learning and development.
2 Building Relationships in the Classroom: explores the role of friendships and relationship-building in early childhood classrooms.
3 The Early Learning Environment: highlights the importance of creating early childhood spaces for young children that support all aspects of their development and growth.
4 The Daily Structure in the Early Childhood Classroom: takes into account active and reflective times, child-initiated and educator-framed learning activities, and indoor and outdoor experiences.
5 The Outdoor Space and the Incorporation of Natural Materials: examines the potential of outdoor spaces in children’s learning and development, and the multiple ways that the natural environment can be used and transformed for outdoor climbing, nesting or socializing; explores the significant place natural materials can occupy in the early childhood classroom.
6 Ordinary Moments: introduces the notion of ‘ordinary moments’ in early childhood classrooms. An ordinary moment is based on an observation of a child or children exploring new ideas and experiences. The examination of these moments provides an opportunity for critical reflection for educators and children.
7 Peer Mentorship and Young Children: highlights the notion of children co-constructing knowledge together in meaningful ways.
8 Children and Educators as Researchers: explores the different ways young children and educators can reflect on their learning, which can in turn, inform and ‘transform’ the development of culturally-relevant early childhood pedagogy.
9 Project Based Thinking: examines how project-based learning encourages rich experiences and deep thinking about a topic or area of interest in children’s worlds.
10 The Integrated Approach: discusses the importance of weaving different concepts, such as mathematical concepts or links to science, in authentic and fluid ways in children’s learning experiences.
11 Leadership in Early Childhood Education: reflects on the importance of cultivating a ‘culture of leadership’ among early childhood educators in the field of early childhood education.
12 Reflection: a discussion of the significant ideas that have resonated with you or transformed your thinking on early childhood education.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Curtis, Deb and Carter, Margie. Designs for Living and Learning: Transforming Early Childhood Environments Second Edition. Redleaf Press., 2014 ISBN: 9781605543727

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Kindergarten Curriculum

ECED 416 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Investigation of a Kindergarten Program
Assignment 2: Planning Project
Assignment 3: A Year in the Life of a Kindergarten Teacher
Assignment 4: Discussion

DESCRIPTION

The development of Kindergarten programs with reference to recent research, theories of early learning, curriculum trends and practices, and the place of Kindergarten in contemporary education. (UBC Calendar)

OBJECTIVES

Students will be given opportunities to:

  • Share ideas, programs, materials and knowledge with colleagues
  • Work from a variety of resources and websites
  • Plan for students’ needs using excellent Kindergarten materials
  • Express the developmental characteristics of Kindergarten learners
  • Recognize developmentally appropriate teaching practices, strategies and assessment related to Kindergarten
  • Learn about some of the current educational issues and differing philosophical perspectives that influence Kindergarten curriculum development
  • Interpret and work with the BC Ministry of Education curriculum documents for Kindergarten students
  • Become familiar of a variety of sources of information (i.e. websites, organizations, journals, etc.) and resources for planning or teaching Kindergarten
  • Identify, describe, and interpret current Kindergarten curriculum issues
  • Describe and create materials conducive to the needs of Kindergarten students in regards to their: Aesthetic and Artistic Development, Emotional and Social Development, Intellectual Development, Physical Development and Well Being, and Social Responsibility and the PLO

PARTICIPATION

Active participation is a requirement for this course. You will be successful if you are involved on a regular basis and make connections with other classmates and the instructor. This means students are expected to engage actively in the learning experiences in the virtual classroom, in course readings and assignments, and in making connections to related school experiences on a weekly basis.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: January 6, 2017


Supporting Learning in the Kindergarten Year

ECED 417 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Online discussion
Assignment 2: Designing an Ideal Early Years Environment
Assignment 3: Final Project

DESCRIPTION

Designing environments, experiences, activities, instruction and assessment to foster children’s learning in the Kindergarten year. (UBC Calendar)

Prerequisites: One of ECED 405; or ECED 416; or teaching experience; or successful completion of extended practicum.

OBJECTIVES

The course reflects the Faculty of Education’s commitment to preparing teachers who are knowledgeable, skillful, flexible and compassionate in their professional practice, and who will be guided by a sense of social and ethical responsibility in relation to their students and the wider society.

You will learn about:

  • The role of Kindergarten in terms of schooling and society
  • Developmentally appropriate practices
  • The design of a child centered Kindergarten class (routines, play and centres)
  • School readiness and activities leading up to Kindergarten
  • Communicating with families and resources
  • Types of assessment practices
  • Various Kindergarten programs
  • Current educational issues Teacher resources

A balance of activities for learning is vital so that we meet everyone’s needs in some way. You will be encouraged to take part in weekly discussions and activities; watch online videos, explore websites, learn from PowerPoint Presentations and information provided by the instructor, and share resources, materials and ideas with peers. 

Active participation is mandatory for this course. You will be successful only if you are involved on a regular basis and make connections with other classmates and the instructor. This means students are expected to engage actively in the learning experiences in the virtual classroom, in course readings and assignments, and in making connections to related school experiences on a regular basis for the term of the course.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS

In lieu of a formal text for the course, a variety of BC Ministry of Education documents, websites, articles and excerpts from texts are used. Download the following materials for all classes and become familiar with them:

Full Day Kindergarten

http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/education-training/early-learning/teach/kindergarten

Primary Years: The Primary Program: A Framework for Teaching

http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/primary_program

BC Ministry of Education Kindergarten – Grade 9 Curriculum

http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/education-training/k-12/teach/curriculum

2010 Saskatchewan Curriculum – Kindergarten Curriculum

https://www.curriculum.gov.sk.ca/webapps/moe-curriculum-BBLEARN/index.jsp?kindergarten=true&lang=en&view=kindergarten_home&subj=kindergarten&level=k

Canadian Association for Young Children (CAYC)

http://www.cayc.ca/content/philosophy

  • Read: Philosophy Statement; Positions Statements: Play Statement – Complete; Positions Statements: Play Statement for School Age Children.

The National Association for the Education of Young Children

http://www.naeyc.org/positionstatements/dap

  • Read the Position Statement on Developmentally Appropriate Practice

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: January 6, 2017


History of Early Childhood Education

ECED 420 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Three (3) assignments consisting of two essays each
Participation

DESCRIPTION

Political and social factors which influenced movements and trends in early childhood education in North America, pre-Kindergarten through primary. (UBC Calendar)

OBJECTIVES

  • To gain a historical perspective of the roots of early childhood education practices in North America
  • To become familiar with the programs and contributions of pioneer educators in the field of early childhood education
  • To study the various theoretical and philosophical paradigms upon which early learning programs are based
  • To become aware of recent events in early education and childcare, and the place of early childhood education in North American life
  • To develop a framework for critical analysis of and reflection on the information and theories covered in this course
  • To provide students with a theoretical foundation upon which they can begin to develop and clarify their own philosophy of early childhood education and practice

OUTLINE

WEEK TOPIC
1 Introductions to ECED 420
2 Historical Overview of Childhood and Education
3 European Roots of Early Childhood Education
4 Beginning of Early Childhood Education in North America
5 Kindergarten Pioneers
6 The Progressive Kindergarten Movement
7 The Child Study Movement and Developmental Theories
8 The Nursery School Movement and the Lab Schools
9 Maria Montessori, Reggio Emilia and the British Infant School
10 Childcare and Social Policy Week
11 The Evolution of Early Childhood Education Curriculum
12 Current Issues in Early Childhood Education in North America

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Supporting Young Children Through Home, School, and Community Relationships

ECED 421 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • There is no exam
  • Online topic discussion forum based on readings and websites responses
  • Examining Your Community
  • Analyzing Programs or Resources
  • Final Assignment is a Research Paper

DESCRIPTION

Philosophy, history and problems of the parent-teacher partnership; development of effective cooperation through individual parent-teacher conferences and parent-group discussions; and examination of community services and inter-professional relationships on behalf of children.

OBJECTIVES

  • Describe the significance of family-school-community links in the education of children and the benefits to the larger community.
  • Describe effective, respectful parental involvement and how this kind of involvement fits within public education systems.
  • Identify potential challenges to building effective school, family and community partnerships.
  • Describe the history, theoretical underpinnings and evolution of parental involvement in North America and Europe.
  • Critically analyze various models of school, family and community programs.
  • Develop a set of principles based upon current research and theory on how to build school, family and community relations.

OUTLINE

WEEK TOPIC
1 What Defines a Family?
2 Roles Parents Play
3 Diversity of Experience
4 What is Family Involvement?
5 Benefits of Partnerships
6 Potential Barriers to Partnerships
7 Informal Communication with Families
8 Family Conferences
9 Families in the Classroom
10 Parent Education
11 It Takes a Village
12 Working With Families from Diverse Backgrounds
13 Working with Families in Particular Circumstances

Articles and readings for each week are provided in the course modules which are accessible through the online Library Course Reserve in the Course.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or
Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Gestwicki, Carol. Home, School & Community Relations Ninth Edition. Cengage Learning, 2015. ISBN: 9781305089013

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Observation and Documentation in Early Childhood Settings

ECED 438 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • There is no exam
  • Five Assignments
  • Five (short) Lesson Activities
  • Online participation
  • Discussion board sessions

DESCRIPTION

This online course presents basic techniques of observation and documentation. This includes recording and interpreting the different skills and behaviours of young children (birth to age 8 years old) and using this information to then integrate children’s individual profiles. The information collected will be used for educational guidance following developmentally appropriate practices in a diversity of early childhood settings.

OBJECTIVES

This online course has been designed for preschool, Kindergarten and elementary teachers, as well as for other professionals; for example, infant and supported child development consultants, social workers, family workers and nurses working in the child development area. As a participant of this course you will:

  1. Acquire, develop and practice effective observation, recording and interpretation skills within the early child development/ early childhood educational contexts.
  2. Understand the role of observation and narratives within pedagogical documentation and authentic assessment practices.
  3. Gain knowledge and develop criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of observational strategies frequently used by teachers in classrooms and early childhood settings, including daycares, out-of-school cares and other settings and programs.
  4. Become knowledgeable about child development milestones between infancy and the Primary school years, and understand the continuum of development – typical and atypical.
  5. Develop an understanding of the uniqueness of each child.
  6. Gain improved understanding of the types of child behaviours that develop out of certain encounters with materials and peers in a variety of different play environment and grouping situations, including the child’s home and family environments.
  7. Recognize family of origin and ethno-cultural factors, and how they impact on the attitudes, beliefs, values, behaviour and interactions of young children.
  8. Recognize parents as partners in education as they provide unique, on-going observations of their children.
  9. Use information provided by on-going observations when handling behavioural problems; when settling conflicts between children; and when dealing with potentially harmful, unsafe or dangerous situations.

OUTLINE

LESSON TOPIC
1 Reflections on observation and documentation
2 Learning about the different ways to observe: methods of observation and documentation
3 Paying attention to developmental milestones: what, how, when in the early years
4 Paying attention to developmental milestones: what, how, when during the school years
5 Children with additional needs
6 Observing social and emotional development in young children
7 Observing and documenting how children communicate
8 Understanding playfulness; documenting children while at play
9 Observing and understanding creativity through expressions of visual arts and music
10 Observing in partnership and collaboration with parents/caregivers and other service providers
11 Challenges in observation and documentation: safety, abuse and/or neglect
12 Through the child’s eyes: ethno-cultural identities, family and community values shape our observation and documentation practices

Articles and readings for each week are provided in the course modules which are accessible through the online Library Course Reserve in the course.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or
Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Nilsen, Barbara Ann. Week by Week: Plans for Documenting Children’s Development  Seventh Edition. Wadsworth Publishing, 2013. ISBN: 9781305501003

*Please note: there is an electronic version of this textbook available.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

Students need to download the Collaborate application launcher to connect via web conference with the instructor when check in sessions are scheduled or to listen to the recorded version. In addition, students should have QuickTime Player or equivalent software installed on their computer to watch video clips.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Assessment of Infants and Young Children with Special Needs

ECED 439 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • 3 Drop-box Assignments
  • 2 Quizzes
  • 3 Discussion Board Assignments

DESCRIPTION

The course examines assessment for program planning purposes for infants and toddlers, and the role of Infant Development and Aboriginal Infant Development and Supported Child Development and Aboriginal Supported Child Development consultants in the process.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This online course is intended to provide students with information related to assessment for program planning purposes within diverse settings. This is a required course for students enrolled in the Infant Development/Supported Child Care Diploma/Certificate Program. It is intended for ID and AID consultants who work with children aged 0-3 in home, childcare or preschool settings; and SCD and ASCD consultants who work with children in childcare and school settings. This course would also be appropriate for early childhood education/pre-school teachers, pediatric nurses and rehabilitative therapists with a special interest in young children. Prospective students are expected to have completed a minimum of two years of college and/or university courses.

Students in the IDSC Diploma/Certificate program must have completed EPSE 348 (Family-Centered Practice) and EPSE 406 (Typical and Atypical Development in Infants and Young Children) prior to enrolling in this course and have completed a survey or introductory course on infant and childcare development. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of typical and atypical development of infants and young children. It is strongly suggested that students who are not in the Infant Development/Supported Child Development Diploma/Certificate Program complete EPSE 406 or a similar course such as EPSE 317, EPSE 403 or ECED 438 before registering in this course.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students will:

  • Understand and be able to utilize appropriate assessment procedures, practices, and tools with infants and young children;
  • Understand the role of ID and SCD consultants in the assessment process;
  • Have a thorough knowledge of basic terminology and tools relating to the assessment process and tools; and
  • Understand the critical role of the family in the assessment process.

OUTLINE

LESSON TOPIC
1 Overview of assessment, including types, history and applicable laws
2 The role of infant development and supported child care consultants in the assessment process
3 Basic terminology, statistical processes, and tools associated with assessments
4 Collaborating with families in the assessment process
5 Knowing when to refer a child for screening or diagnostic assessments
6 Assessment of social, communication, and language skills
7 Assessment of cognitive, motor, and sensory skills
8 Identifying achievable goals and objectives for program planning
9 Interpreting assessment reports from other professionals

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order:  604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1 800-661-3889 or
Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • McLean, Mary, Wolery, Mark and Bailey, Donald B. Assessing Infants and Preschoolers with Special Needs Third Edition.   Pearson Education Canada Ltd., 2003. ISBN: 9780130986627
  • Meisels, Samuel J. and Atkins-Burnett, Sally. Developmental Screening in Early Childhood Education A Guide 5th Edition. National Association for the Education of Young Children, 2005. ISBN: 9781928896258

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more info, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Supporting Social and Communication Development in Infants and Young Children with Special Needs

ECED 440 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Three short individual assignments
  • Case study with 3 components (completed individually or within a group)
  • Weekly discussions/responses

DESCRIPTION

Intervention and program planning for communication/language development, social/emotional development and behavioural support.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

This online course is intended to provide students with information related to social and communication development for program planning purposes within diverse settings. This is a required course for students enrolled in the Infant Development/Supported Child Care Diploma/Certificate Program. It is intended for ID consultants who work with children aged 0-3 in home, childcare or preschool settings; and SCC consultants who work with children in childcare and school settings.

This course is also appropriate for teachers, teacher aides, pediatric nurses, rehabilitative therapists, social workers or group home specialists who have a particular interest in infants, preschool and school age children with language, communication or behavior challenges. Prospective students are expected to have completed a minimum of two years of college and/or university courses.

Students in the IDSC Diploma/Certificate Program must have completed EPSE 348 (Family-Centered Practice), EPSE 406 (Typical and Atypical Development in Infants and Young Children) and ECED 439 (Assessment of Infants and Young Children with Special Needs) prior to enrolling in this course and have completed a survey or introductory course on infant and childcare development. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of typical and atypical development of infants and young children. It is strongly suggested that students who are not in the Infant Development/Supported Child Development Diploma/Certificate Program complete EPSE 406 or a similar course such as EPSE 317, EPSE 403 or ECED 438 before registering for this course.

OBJECTIVES

  • To understand the critical role of the family when implementing culturally sensitive support for children and their families in the intervention process;
  • To understand and use a common set of principles to assist in the individualized intervention plans to meet infants’ and young children’s social and communication needs;
  • To become familiar with a range of strategies to promote the development of social and communication skills within and across environments; and
  • To enhance environments to promote active engagement, learning and membership for infants and young children.

OUTLINE

LESSON TOPIC
1 Overview of Social and Communication Development in Early Intervention
2 General Language Intervention Strategies
3 Augmentative and Alternative Communication
4 Language Interventions for Specific Populations
5 Speech Interventions
6 Autism Spectrum Disorders
7 Multiple Disabilities, Including Visual Impairments
8 Prevention of Behaviour Problems for Children at Risk
9 Positive Behaviour Support

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1 800-661-3889 or
Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Pepper, Jan and Weitzman, Elaine based on the Third Edition by Ayala Hanen Manolson. It Takes Two to Talk: A Practical Guide for Parents of Children with Language Delays. Toronto, ON: The Hanen Centre, 2004. ISBN: 9780921145195

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Early Intervention for Infants and Young Children with Sensory Loss and Motor Impairments

ECED 441 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Seven Assignments
Two Quizzes

DESCRIPTION

This online course prepares students to develop and implement early intervention strategies for children who have vision and/or hearing loss and motor disorders.

This online course is intended to provide students with information related to assessment for program planning purposes within diverse settings. This is a required course for students enrolled in the Infant Development and Supported Child Care Diploma/Certificate Program. It is intended for ID consultants who work with children aged 0-3 in home, childcare or preschool settings; and SCC consultants who work with children in childcare and school settings.

This course is also appropriate for teachers, teacher aides, pediatric nurses, rehabilitative therapists, social workers or group home specialists who have a particular interest in infants, preschool and school age children with vision and/or hearing loss and motor delays. Prospective students are expected to have completed a minimum of two years of college and/or university courses.

Students in the IDSC Diploma/Certificate Program must have completed EPSE 348 (Family-Centered Practice for Children with Special Needs), EPSE 406 (Typical and Atypical Development in Infants and Children), and ECED 439 (Assessment of Infants and Young Children with Special Needs) prior to enrolling in this course. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of typical and atypical development of infants and young children. It is strongly suggested that students who are not in the Infant Development and Supported Child Development Diploma/Certificate Program complete EPSE 406 or a similar course such as EPSE 317, EPSE 403 or ECED 438.

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the course, students will:

  • Become familiar with diagnoses that affect development, and the learning needs of children within this population.
  • Understand a theoretical framework of early intervention and learned to apply it to “best practice” guidelines that promote optimal development.
  • Learn to work collaboratively with families to identify and address the learning needs of children, within the context of family concerns and values.
  • Develop a process for gathering and sharing information with families and community service providers.

OUTLINE

LESSON CHILDREN AT RISK FOR/WITH:
1 Cerebral palsy
2 Motor conditions
3 Motor impairments and children who have secondary motor conditions
4 Visual impairments
5 Combined visual and motor impairments
6 Hearing loss: diagnosis, amplification, parent support
7 Hearing loss: communication
8 Specific types of hearing loss
9 Deaf and blindness
10 Multiple diagnoses or who are medically fragile

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or
Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Lane, Susan; Bell, Lori; and Parson-Tylka, Terry. My Turn To Learn A Communication Guide for Parents of Deaf or Hard of Hearing Children. Elks Family Hearing Resource Centre, 1997. ISBN: 9780968096406

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Supporting Indigenous Infants and Young Children within the Context of Their Communities

ECED 442 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Postings
Assignment 2: Journals
Assignment 3: Self-Location Paper and Indigenous intersections
Assignment 4: Plan of care for an Aboriginal child in your child care centre/Kindergarten

DESCRIPTION

As this online course is situated on Coast Salish lands, the course will focus primarily on people, traditions and ways of knowing related to the BC First Nations and the Métis.

OBJECTIVES

Students will be asked to discuss, share, process and analyse their learning through activities such as reading, listening to podcasts, watching films, keeping journals, writing assignments, completing short quizzes, and creating a childhood portfolio related to their own life.

This online course will provide early childhood development professionals with an introductory view of perspectives related to Indigenous (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) families in Canada, particularly in British Columbia.  Students will explore:  Indigenous perspectives of childhood and lifespan development; Indigenous communities and colonial history; and the importance of culture and identity for the well-being of Indigenous children. As part of this course, students will:

  • Learn about the languages and tribal groups in British Columbia.
  • Learn about the importance of land and territory in relation to identity.
  • Gain more understanding of the history of residential school and the negative history of child welfare for Indigenous families.
  • Explore Indigenous worldview, perspectives on child and lifespan development and the roles of children in relation to their family.
  • Study Indigenous approaches to “home visiting”, developmental and needs assessment and family support.
  • Explore ways of understanding special needs and supporting children who are differently-abled and their families.
  • Recognize the importance of ceremony and celebration in the lives of First Nations, Métis and Inuit families.

OUTLINE

UNIT TOPIC
1 An Introduction to ECED 425 and Indigenous British Columbia
2 A History of Colonialism in Canada
3 Indigenous Worldview and Learning
4 Indigenous Families and the Life Cycle
5 Identity for Indigenous Children
6 Home Visiting and Assessing Child, Family, Parental Relational Needs
7 Practice Skills
8 Working with Children with Special Needs
9 Ceremony and Celebration

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Maracle, Lee. Celia’s Song. Cormorant Books, 2014. ISBN: 9781770864160

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Selected Topics in Early Childhood Education: Sociocultural Perspectives in Early Childhood Education

ECED 480B (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Reading Responses
Discussion Posts
Two Sociocultural Interviews and Analysis or Examination of a Child’s World
Final Paper

DESCRIPTION

In this online course, we will investigate the breadth of research on early learning within a sociocultural theoretical framework. We will examine the ways that children engage in a range of learning activities and accumulate a rich array of experiences across the significant contexts in their world (e.g., home, school, community). We will reflect on the importance of different types of relationships for young children and examine the ways a range of mediators impact children’s worlds. We will explore how children’s identities are influenced by the contexts and people they encounter as they travel through childhood.

OBJECTIVES

  • To learn about young children’s development from a sociocultural perspective
  • To examine the multiple mediators and sociocultural contexts that are part of young children’s worlds
  • To consider the ways in which children’s identities are constructed due to their experiences
  • To reflect on the importance of nurturing, valuing and honouring children’s interests and funds of knowledge in early childhood contexts

OUTLINE

  1. The History of Sociocultural Theory
  2. Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological System
  3. Young Children as Active Learners – A Global Perspective
  4. Invisible Mediators in Young Children’s Worlds
  5. Young Children’s Funds of Knowledge
  6. The Connection between Play and Sociocultural Theory
  7. The Evolving Nature of Social and Cultural Practices in Aboriginal Children’s Worlds
  8. Valuing, Respecting and Including Immigrant Children’s Languages in the Early Childhood Setting
  9. Sociocultural Theory and The Early Learning Environment
  10. Sociocultural Approaches to Assessment
  11. The Role of the Early Childhood Educator
  12. Reflection

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No ECED course(s) were found for W2017 term.

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria.

UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No EDCP course(s) were found for W2017 term.

Introduction to the Study of Higher Education

EDST 493 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

(formerly ADHE 493)

EVALUATION

Students are expected to complete all modules, sub-modules and related activities. It is also expected that students will complete the relevant readings prior to the completion of each sub-module. Evaluation will be based on class assignments and participation.

DESCRIPTION

This online course is intended to provide an introduction to the study of higher education. The field of higher education focuses on the study of all facets of institutions of higher learning. That is, it is the study of the institutions of higher education and everything that happens within them and in relation to the larger society.

No previous knowledge of this topic is required.

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 An introduction to the study of higher education, including a brief history of higher education and an overview of Canadian systems of higher education
2 The structure and organization of higher education, including public, private and mixed goods, public/private, non-profit/for-profit higher education, elite higher education.
3 Access to higher education, including an examination of concepts central to participation and opportunities
4 Internationalization of higher education where we address topics such as student mobility, university rankings, and global competition

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No EDST course(s) were found for W2017 term.

Teaching Highly Able Learners

EPSE 303 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Weekly Learning Journal reflections
  • Weekly posts to the Discussion Forum
  • Discussion leadership
  • 2 individual assignments

DESCRIPTION

Identification and appraisal of developmental and educational needs of highly able learners. (UBC Calendar)

The online course, EPSE 303, considers current conceptions of giftedness and creativity and methods for testing and assessing students. It addresses the variety of ways in which abilities can be demonstrated, development of giftedness across the life span, other exceptional learning needs that can co-occur with giftedness, social and emotional development, and cultural perspectives on intelligence and giftedness. Course participants are encouraged to pursue areas of particular interest.

It is recommended that students take this course in conjunction with the online course, EPSE 408 – Educational Programming for Highly Able Learners, offered in January of each year. EPSE 303 and EPSE 408 are complementary courses, providing background in understanding the characteristics and needs of highly able learners followed by in-depth consideration of how to meet those needs in the inclusive classroom.

OBJECTIVES

  • Understanding of the characteristics of advanced development in academic and creative disciplines
  • Understanding the challenges and gifts of students who are “twice exceptional” (e.g., gifted learning disabled, gifted with ADHD, gifted with autism spectrum disorders)
  • Knowledge of different conceptions and models of giftedness
  • Knowledge of conceptions and models that facilitate the recognition of abilities and the realization of potential
  • Understanding the relationship between giftedness and creativity
  • Acquisition of a repertoire of classroom-based assessment strategies and understanding of standardized psychoeducational assessments
  • Understanding of general principles for planning appropriate educational experiences that optimize the development of giftedness and creativity.

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 Introduction to giftedness: Tracing an evolving paradigm
2 Conceptions of giftedness: Current theoretical models of intelligence
3 Neuroscience and giftedness
4 The process of identification: Learning more about students’ abilities
5 Young gifted children: Attributes, identification and support
6 Creativity and its educational implications
7 Giftedness and other exceptionalities
8 Gifted learners with autism spectrum disorders and gifted learners with nonverbal learning disabilities
9 Emotional intelligence, moral development, and empowerment
10 Social emotional development of the gifted: Issues and Interventions
11 Outliers: An examination of greatness
12 Presentations of final assignment

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Required readings will be made available through UBC Library’s e-journal system. It is expected that you will supplement the assigned readings with readings relevant to your own interests. Additional references are included in the course modules.

There is no textbook required.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Development and Exceptionality in the Regular Classroom

EPSE 317 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Grade type:  Pass/Fail
  • Resource Guide
  • Individual Education Plan
  • Weekly Learning Responses
  • Weekly Discussion Posts/Responses

DESCRIPTION

The teacher’s role in dealing with major developmental and special educational issues and problems within the regular classroom program, including working with supportive services, parents and communities.

Pre-requisites and/or Co-requisites: one of EPSE 306 and EPSE 313. The pre-requisites may be waived with the permission of the instructor.

OBJECTIVES

  • To become cognizant of the teacher’s role in dealing with major developmental and special education issues and problems within the regular classroom program, including working with supportive services, parents and communities.
  • To become aware of information concerning current issues relevant to special education in Canada, and the impact recent changes will have for regular classroom teachers.
  • To obtain knowledge regarding stereotypes, professional classification and characteristics of children with special needs.
  • To become cognizant of information regarding the categorization of children with special needs and issues related to the identification process and provision of services.
  • To develop an understanding of assessment and program planning for children with special needs in regular education settings.
  • To develop an understanding of the organizational and planning strategies (including techniques and materials) for an inclusive classroom.

OUTLINE

LESSON TOPIC
 1 Introduction
 2 The Individual Education Plan
 3 Designing Inclusive Classrooms
 4 Communication Disorders
 5 Learning Disabilities
 6 Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
7 Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders
 8 Intellectual Disabilities
 9 Autism Spectrum Disorder
 10 Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
11 Low-Incident Disabilities
 12 Special Talents and Gifted

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, toll free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

Option 1: (hardcopy)

  • Smith, T., Polloway, E., Patton, J., Dowdy, C., McIntyre, L. (2015). Teaching students with special needs in inclusive settings (5th Canadian ed.). Toronto: Pearson Education. ISBN: 9780134396941

or

Option 2: (e-book)

  • Smith, T., Polloway, E., Patton, J., Dowdy, C., McIntyre, L. (2015). Teaching students with special needs in inclusive settings. (5th Canadian ed.). Go to: http://www.myeducationlab.com (Special Education)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Family-Centered Practice for Children with Special Needs

EPSE 348 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignments include group discussions and case studies to incorporate the principles of the lessons. Students will practice applying the learned strategies and principles to decision making and supporting families and children with special needs in the case studies. Each case study will become incrementally more challenging as the lessons progress.

  • 6 assignments
  • Group discussions

DESCRIPTION

Provision of appropriate supports to families of infants and young children with special needs. Application of the principles of family-centred practice for school-aged children is also included. (UBC Calendar)

This online course introduces key principles and practices and effective help giving approaches for family-centred practice. It encourages a shift from the traditional helping model of expert/specialist to a model that involves mutual partnership with families in decision making, and determining goals and interventions for their child.

The course is suitable for Infant Development (ID) and Aboriginal Infant Development (AID) Program Consultants, Supported Child Development (SCD) and Aboriginal Supported Child Development (ASCD) Consultants, early childhood educators, teachers, classroom aides, child protection workers, nurses, family support workers and others who work with families or team members in special education and intervention settings. The course is based on the work of leading researchers in intervention and family-centred practice. A range of viewpoints is represented by the use of course readings instead of a single text. Principles of cultural competence and safety will be stressed with emphasis on the strengths of First Nations, and Aboriginal families in British Columbia.

There are no prerequisites for this course. However, it is strongly advised non-Education students register for the 5 core courses in this order: EPSE 348, EPSE 406, ECED 439, ECED 440, and ECED 441.

OBJECTIVES

  • Review historical and theoretical factors of early childhood intervention
  • Examine Early Childhood Intervention and principles of practice
  • Identify and apply key principles of family-centred practice
  • Describe and use effective family-centred strategies with children and their families
  • Describe ineffective and effective help giving practices
  • Recognize the challenges and strengths of families in order to develop appropriate intervention plans
  • Define and discuss formal and informal supports
  • Examine and describe culturally-competent practices and communication skills
  • Explore ethical issues and the use of ethical principles and codes of ethics when facing ethical decisions

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

There is no textbook required.

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Lastest Revision on: January 6, 2017


Special Topics in Special Education: Educating for Creativity

EPSE 390 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Assignments: Weekly learning journals in response to provocations ; Discussion forum leadership role;
  • Participation in eight online discussion forums; Four individual assignments
  • Web-conference presentation dates: one of three dates during the final week of classes. (TBD) between 5:00 and 7:00 pm.  Students are expected to be online participants at one of the presentation evenings.

DESCRIPTION

UBC Calendar Description: A study of innovative practices, ideas, and theories in special education. The specific topics may change yearly to reflect changing priorities and interests in special education, and the specific interest and competencies of visiting and regular faculty.

Prerequisite: The pre-requisite is waived for this section. Permission of the instructor is not required.

COURSE RATIONALE

Recent years have seen an exponential growth in the literature of education and neuroscience on the subject of creativity.  Educators, business leaders, policy makers and scientists are speaking out on the vital importance of creativity to progress in our 21st century world.  It falls on educators to equip students with the mindset and the skills that will enable them to be creative innovators and productive 21st century citizens. The development of creativity has become an essential goal for our students. The intent of this course is to facilitate the purposeful pedagogy, generative curricula and design of dynamic contexts that will support the development of creativity in learners.

GOALS

The goal of this course is to offer students:

  • An overview of the scientific study of creativity and an understanding of its relevance to learning
  • An investigation of the creative process, the role of metaphoric thinking, unconscious processing and cognitive states that support creativity
  • An examination of the attributes of creative educational cultures
  • An exploration of developmental creativity
  • A discussion of sound assessment processes
  • A review of educational curriculum that will promote curiosity, engagement and creative production in learners

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more info, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: August 31, 2016


Education of Students with Developmental Disabilities in Inclusive Settings

EPSE 403 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • 4 assignments
  • 2 quizzes

DESCRIPTION

Intervention and program planning in regular education classrooms for students with developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, autism and cerebral palsy. (UBC Calendar)

EPSE 403 is one of the courses students are advised to include in the Diploma in Education – Special Education. It would also be appropriate for graduate students in education, social work, nursing or related fields who want a basic course in developmental disabilities. Finally, teachers and others who require practical information about including students with developmental disabilities in regular classrooms will find this course useful and may enroll as Unclassified students. This online course is intended to provide educators and others with information related to supporting individuals with developmental disabilities in inclusive school and community settings. By the end of the course, you will have learned:

  • about the historical and other factors that contribute to attitudes about and services provided to people with developmental disabilities;
  • how to develop individual education plans (IEPs) and adapt/modify curricula and instruction for students with developmental disabilities in regular classrooms;
  • how to support the development of social relationships between students with disabilities and their peers; and
  • how to implement instructional, communication, and behaviour support approaches for these individuals.

OUTLINE

  1. Introduction and basic concepts
  2. History of services to people with developmental disabilities
  3. Handicapism
  4. Primary causes of developmental disabilities
  5. Inclusion, membership and belonging
  6. Key elements of inclusion
  7. Planning for inclusion: developing IEPs
  8. Lesson planning and adapting/modifying instruction in inclusive classrooms
  9. Instructional techniques
  10. Facilitating friendships and social supports
  11. Supporting communication in inclusive classrooms
  12. Supporting students with problem behaviour

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

There is no textbook required.

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Typical and Atypical Development in Infants and Children

EPSE 406 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

5 Assignments

DESCRIPTION

A review of typical development, and primary focus on issues of atypical development in infants and young children, including fetal alcohol syndrome, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, autism and vision or hearing impairments. (UBC Calendar)

This online course examines the typical and atypical developmental processes of young children from birth to six years. It provides a framework for understanding the impact of disabling conditions on the developmental process.

EPSE 406 is intended for Infant Development and Aboriginal Infant Development Consultants who work with children with special needs and their families from birth to Kindergarten entry in home, childcare or pre-school settings and for Supported Child Development and Aboriginal Supported Child Development Consultants who work with children with special needs in childcare and school settings. It would be appropriate for early education/pre-school teachers, pediatric nurses and therapists with a special interest in young children. It is expected that students will have completed a survey or introductory course on infant and child development. It is a required course for the Infant Development & Supported Child Development Diploma/Certificate Program.

OBJECTIVES

This online course is intended to provide students with information related to the development of typical and atypical infants and children within a multicultural perspective. By the end of the course, you should be able to:

  • Identify and apply theories of child development to both typical and atypical infants and toddlers; acquire a working knowledge of infant development across all developmental domains: cognitive, motor, social-emotional, communication, adaptive.
  • Identify pre-, peri-, and postnatal development and risk factors such as biological and environmental conditions that affect infant/toddler development and learning.
  • Identify specific disabilities including etiology, characteristics and classifications of common disabilities in infants and toddlers; describe specific implications for development and learning in the first years of life.

OUTLINE

LESSON TOPIC
1 The Context of Early Development
2 Genetic and Environmental Foundations of Development
3 Prenatal Development
4 The Newborn and Medically Compromised Births
5 Sensation and Perception: Vision and Hearing Loss
6 Communication and Language
7 Physical Growth, Neuro-muscular Development and Motor Skills
8 Disorders affecting Motor Development
9 Cognition
10 Extremes in Cognitive Development
11 Emotional and Social Development
12 Disturbance in Emotional and Social Development in Children

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Berk, Laura E. and Meyers, Adena B. Infants and Children Prenatal through Middle Childhood Eighth Edition. Pearson Education Canada Ltd., 2015. ISBN: 9780133936728

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Educational Programming for Highly Able Learners

EPSE 408 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Weekly Learning Journal Reflections or posts to the Discussion Forum
  • One group/individual assignment: Matching learning strategies to strengths for gifted learners
  • Four individual assignments: Curriculum transformation; Personal inquiry project proposal; Personal Inquiry project (including self-evaluation); Response to peers’ personal inquiry projects

DESCRIPTION

Planning elementary and secondary level programs for highly able learners. (UBC Calendar)

This online course provides a survey of programming options and curriculum for highly able learners from Kindergarten to Grade 12. It includes strategies with which to match abilities and needs to curriculum and covers a variety of program delivery models. Course participants will be invited to explore areas of interest in designing appropriate learning experiences for highly able learners.

It is recommended that students have their teaching certificates. Students should take this course in conjunction with the online course EPSE 303 offered in September of each year. EPSE 303 and EPSE 408 are complementary courses, providing background in understanding the characteristics and needs of highly able learners followed by in-depth consideration of how to meet those needs in the inclusive classroom.

OBJECTIVES

  • Recognition of the cognitive and affective characteristics of advanced development, the learning profiles of highly able learners and their curricular implications
  • Understanding of general principles for planning appropriate educational experiences that optimize the development of giftedness and creativity
  • Application of the foundational principles of curriculum planning for highly able learners
  • Acquiring a repertoire of curriculum planning and programming strategies

 OUTLINE

MODULE TOPICS
1 Programming Options for Higher Ability Learners

  • Premises of gifted programming
  • Responding to the needs of gifted learners
  • Guidelines for curriculum compacting
  • Acceleration
2 Students with artistic, athletic and musical gifts

  • Considering prevailing notions of giftedness
  • Supporting knowledge and creativity in talented students
3 Designing Curriculum for Engagement and Challenge

  • Understanding by Design as a framework for robust curriculum
  • Crafting critical questions
4 Specific Strategies for Differentiating Curriculum

  • Effective frameworks for differentiating curriculum
  • Units designed around a global theme
  • Units designed using a process/product/process matrix
5 Interventions and Individual Educational Plans

  • Role of the school-based team
  • Guidelines for developing an Individual Educational Plan
  • Matching strategies to strengths for gifted learners
6 Principles in Designing Literature and Writing Experiences for Highly Able Learners

  • The developmental course of reading and writing
  • Criteria for selecting appropriate resources
  • Assessing reading and writing in highly able learners
7 Principles in Designing a Mathematics Curriculum for Highly Able Learners

  • Identifying mathematical talent
  • Principles of curriculum design for mathematically talented students
8 Critical Thinking – Its Process and Application

  • Elements and standards of critical thinking
  • Teaching philosophy to children
  • Future problem solving
9 Designing Qualitatively Different Curriculum

  • Theories and principles of problem based learning
  • Guidelines for creating a problem based learning unit
10 Mentorship: Supporting Independent Learning

  • Principles and guidelines for developing a mentorship program
11 Researching Our Practice and Evaluating Curriculum

  • Models of Mind
  • Teacher as researcher
  • Guidelines for evaluating our practice
12 Personal inquiry project submissions and responses

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Required readings will be made available through UBC Library’s e-journal system. It is expected that you will supplement the assigned readings with readings relevant to your own interests. Additional references are included in the course modules.

There is no textbook required.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Assistive Technology in Special Education

EPSE 410 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Participation
  • Communication (Individual)
  • Learning – Blogs (Individual)
  • Learning – Course Project (Small Group)

Groups will present their projects during the final scheduled online meeting of the course. Specific details of the group projects will be given during Module 1.

DESCRIPTION

The use of microcomputers, adaptive technology, and software across age levels and areas of exceptionality in special education and health care settings. (UBC Calendar)

In today’s complex and dynamic classroom environment, teachers are challenged to include students having a wide variety of needs in daily curricular activities. With the help of assistive technology, students of all abilities can reach their individual potential by successfully participating, communicating and learning. Over the past two decades, assistive technology has evolved from situation specific devices or adaptations, to more general software and hardware solutions which can support students along a continuum of ability.

This online course is designed to provide participants with an overview of the field of assistive technology, an understanding of how to implement various technology solutions, and experience using specific technologies to create technology-enhanced learning activities to support students with diverse needs in the classroom.

OBJECTIVES

Upon successful completion of the course, participants will:

  1. Have a general understanding of the field of assistive technology and be able to describe technologies that support participation, communication, and learning in the classroom.
  2. Be able to describe the process for successful assistive technology implementation and the conditions that foster or challenge effective implementation.
  3. Have a general understanding of how to match assistive technology features to student need and how to use those features to support participation, communication and learning in the classroom.
  4. Be able to describe how to adjust unit and lesson plans to include assistive technology solutions that support students’ individual education plans.
  5. Be able to use specific assistive software and/or hardware to create support resources that a student could use in a classroom setting.
  6. Understand how assistive technology can be used to support current teaching and learning trends (e.g. Universal Design for Learning).
  7. Understand how to utilize a variety of online resources and training opportunities to expand and support their assistive technology knowledge and skills.

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 Introduction
2 Overview of Assistance Technology
3 The AT Implementation Process
4 AT that Supports Learning
5 AT that Supports Participation

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Dell, Amy G.; Newton, Deborah; and Petroff, Jerry G. Assistive Technology in the Classroom Enhancing the School Experiences of Students with Disabilities Second Edition. Pearson Education, 2011. ISBN: 9780131390409

Supplemental articles will be accessible through the online Library Course Reserve.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This course is offered online through SET-BC – www.setbc.org

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Classroom Management

EPSE 432 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Weekly Discussions/Reflection topics
  • Six assignments/activities that will reflect the materials discussed in class.
  • Final Reflection Paper (3-5 pages)

DESCRIPTION

Instructional and environmental strategies for preventing and responding effectively to behaviour problems in classrooms. (UBC Calendar)

The central purpose of this online course is to enable you to design a positive classroom climate where you and your students can engage in meaningful learning experiences together. In order to reach this goal, we will explore a range of research supported strategies for individual, classroom and school wide behaviour support. The class will be highly interactive and experiential, providing opportunities for student discussion, skills practice and exploration of classroom management topics. Throughout the course, students will learn:  (a) important preventative strategies to avoid problem behaviour in the first place; (b) the basic functions of student behaviour; and (c) the skills to apply those principles to teaching, positive behaviour support, and the design of effective classrooms. The course is organized to prepare you to achieve success with most of your students and therefore increase the likelihood of your personal satisfaction as a teaching professional.

OBJECTIVES

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to demonstrate your knowledge in the following areas:

  1. Schoolwide Positive Behaviour Support (SW-PBS)
    • Define PBS
    • Understand research support for preventative methods
    • Describe examples of PBS
    • Know the steps in planning and implementing school wide PBS
  2. Behaviour Management
    • Identify a variety of problem behaviours that you may encounter as a teacher
    • Understand the critical role of the teacher in prevention and positive behaviour support
    • Design a positive classroom environment
    • Know how to apply effective individual behaviour interventions
    • Practice positive management skills through role plays, scenarios and video enactments
    • Explore your own assumptions about student behaviour and discipline that may help or hinder your ability to manage a classroom
    • Know the major theoretical models of behaviour and their relevance to classroom settings
  3. Academic and Behaviour Assessment
    • Describe a functional assessment and functional behavioural analysis (FBA)
    • Describe procedures and processes for using a FBA as a tool
    • Make a variety of behaviour intervention plans
    • Understand prevention through the use of academic monitoring and curriculum-based measurement
    • Describe and use assessment information to guide the development of behaviour support planning
  4. Proactive Learning Environments
    • Write rules and procedures for your classroom
    • Design a sequence for teaching behaviour to your students
    • Know how to use effective schedules and how to organize your classroom for prevention
    • Establish meaningful, positive relationships with your students, parents and support staff
    • Identify and implement the features of high-quality instruction
  5. Increase Learning Behaviour and Decrease Behavioural Challenges
    • Know the types of reinforcement
    • Develop and implement reinforcement systems in your classroom
    • Prevent misbehaviour through specific reinforcement applications
    • Use behaviour reductive techniques to reduce challenging behavior
    • Describe the standards of the British Columbia College of Teachers and your responsibility as a teaching professional

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll free in North America:  1-800-661-3889, or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Scheuermann, J. A. Hall (2015). Positive behavioral supports for the classroom. Pearson Education Canada. ISBN: 9780133803259
  • Knoster, T. (2014). The teacher’s pocket guide for effective classroom management. Brookes Publishing Company Incorporated, Paul H.. ISBN: 9781598574029

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Lastest Revision on: January 11, 2017


Education of Students with Autism

EPSE 449 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

There is no exam. Evaluation will be based on lesson-related quizzes and discussion questions and case-study-based assignments.

DESCRIPTION

Topics in this online course include the history, causes, and characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD); assessment for screening, diagnosis and program planning; early intervention; visual and environmental supports; including students with ASD in general education classrooms; and evidence-based communication and social skills interventions.

This upper undergraduate course is appropriate for teachers, speech-language pathologists and other individuals who wish to increase their understanding of evidence-based practices for students with autism spectrum disorders. It is also appropriate for individuals who plan to apply for a graduate program in autism/developmental disabilities at UBC.  This course fulfills the autism course requirement for professionals who wish to apply to the Registry of Autism Service providers (RASP).

OBJECTIVES

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to demonstrate your knowledge in the following areas:

  • History of autism and interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder
  • Current diagnostic criteria for ASD
  • Current research in the area of causal factors
  • Characteristics of individuals with autism spectrum disorder
  • Assessment tools for screening and diagnosis
  • Early Intervention approaches
  • Assessment for program planning and IEP development
  • Visual and environmental supports for individual with ASD
  • Strategies to promote the inclusion of students with autism in general education settings
  • Literacy instruction for students with ASD
  • Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) for individuals with ASD
  • Strategies for addressing echolalia and other language-based challenges
  • Social skills challenges and interventions
  • Addressing sensory challenges experienced by individuals with ASD

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: January 11, 2017


Critical Issues in Special Education

EPSE 512 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

DESCRIPTION

This online course is intended to introduce students to a sample of the variety of issues and problems in the field of Special Education. Due to the vast array of topics within the field, it is not possible to cover every type of problem or issue practitioners will encounter; thus, only a small selection of topics are included in this course. The initial part of the course will be devoted to literature that will provide students with a template from which to approach their future readings. We will attempt to view issues from the perspectives of many of the different stakeholders in special education. Students will also be provided opportunities to peruse an issue or topic that is of particular interest to them.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: January 11, 2017


UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No EPSE course(s) were found for W2017 term.

Home Economics II – Secondary: Curriculum and Pedagogy

EDCP 491 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Discussion 1 (includes “Who’s Who of Home Economics”)
  • Platform Statement
  • Teaching Strategy Presentation
  • Culminating Project for Module 3
  • Year Outline
  • Unit Plan
  • 3 Lesson Plans

DESCRIPTION

This online course provides an introduction to home economics curriculum and pedagogy. It includes an introduction to the history and philosophy of home economics education as a way of understanding curricular possibilities in the present and future.

This online course focuses on making defensible pedagogical judgments considering how students learn, the role of the teacher, the aims and purposes of schooling, what counts as subject matter and knowledge, and school and community context. Familiarity with knowledge issues, teaching approaches, resources and materials, and assessment and evaluation in relation to home economics education are emphasized. This course is directed towards preparing you for teaching home economics, particularly highlighting planning processes and teaching approaches. The scope of the course includes the content areas of food and nutrition, clothing and textiles, and family management at both junior and senior secondary levels.

OUTLINE

This online course will assist you with:

  • Understanding alternate philosophies of home economics and their evolution in relation to changing social realities.
  • Articulating and defending a personal philosophy of, and orientation to, home economics education informed by professionally relevant conceptualizations.
  • Formulating goals and objectives for course, unit and lesson planning appropriate for home economics education mandated curriculum.
  • Developing resources in support of teaching.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no required text. Additional readings are included in the course modules.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Special Study in Home Economics: Textile Studies, An Exploration of Textiles and Design: Issues, Innovations and Influences

EDCP 492 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Weekly Review Quizzes for Module 1
  • Reading Responses for Modules 2, 3 and 4
  • Group Projects for Modules 2 and 3 (round robin)
  • Individual Assignment for Module 2
  • Individual Assignment for Module 3
  • Individual Assignment for Module 4

DESCRIPTION

This online course is designed for those who want to explore the topic of textile studies in preparation for teaching home economics/family studies in the secondary school or for general interest. Students will examine a variety of sample textiles, create a textile sample kit for future reference, and study the processes from fiber to fabric to finishing. Students will also investigate and analyze historical and cultural influences related to textiles and clothing; learn and apply the elements and principles of design to textile products; and investigate contemporary issues related to textiles and clothing.

OUTLINE

Module 1: From Fiber to Fabric
Week 1 Introduction
Week 2 Natural Fibers
Week 3 Manufactured Fibers
Week 4 Yarns
Week 5 Fabric
Week 6 Dyeing, Printing and Finishing
Module 2: Historical and Cultural Perspectives on Textile Use and Design
Week 7 Culture, Race and Ethnicity and Textiles
Week 8 Historical Study of Clothing and Textiles
Week 9 Culture and History Influence on Modern Textiles and Dress
Module 3: Elements of Principles of Design
Week 10 Elements of Design
Week 11 Principles of Design
Module 4: Issues Related to Textiles and Dress
Week 12 Identifying the Issues
Week 13 An Exploration of an Issue

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or
Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • The Textile Kit™ with iTextiles™ ATEXINC ©2015 ISBN: 9781604051421

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Special Study in Home Economics: Foods Studies

EDCP 493 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Quizzes
  • Small Assignments
  • Reading Responses and Discussion
  • Collaborative Analysis
  • Food Safe Exam (or alternate assignment if you already have Food Safe Certification)
  • Food Technique Demonstration
  • Recipe Deconstruction

DESCRIPTION

This online course is a special topics course designed for those who want to explore the topic of food studies in preparation for teaching home economics/family studies in the secondary school or for general interest. Why does food matter? Why is there so much interest in food? What constitutes healthy food choices? How do we make sense of nutritional claims? What is the role of food guides? What factors (social, cultural, political, economic) influence food preparation and consumption?

These are some of the questions that will guide students through this course that focuses on the interdisciplinary of food studies. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the key concepts covered in food and nutrition courses taught in high schools. They will consider the ways food preparation is influenced by principles, techniques and food science. Investigation and analysis of food issues will also be covered.

Food Safe Certification is part of the course. Those students who have not taken Food Safe will be required to take it. There is a fee for the Food Safe Course – register through http://www.foodsafe.ca or take a face-to-face course in your community.

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 An Introduction to Food Studies (1 week)
2 Healthy Eating: Nutrition, Applications and Issues (3 weeks)
3 Socio/Economic/Cultural/Political Perspectives on Food (3 weeks)
4 Food Safety (2 weeks)
5 Food Preparation: Tools, Techniques and Principles (4 weeks)

OBJECTIVES

  • To become familiar with terminology and classification, related to nutrition and healthy eating
  • To evaluate nutritional and food related claims
  • To develop an inquiring attitude related to food preparation and consumption
  • To apply knowledge of food safety, food science and food preparation principles and techniques
  • To develop a critical perspective regarding the issues related to food studies

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Course readings will be accessible online.

Foundational reading for the first four modules:

Food, Health and Well-Being in British Columbia, Provincial Health Officer’s Annual Report 2005

http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/health/about-bc-s-health-care-system/office-of-the-provincial-health-officer/reports-publications/annual-reports/phoannual2005.pdf

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Special Study in Home Economics: Family Studies

EDCP 494 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Weekly Responses and Discussion
  • Module 1: Major Group Assignment
  • Module 2: Issue Analysis
  • Module 3: Case Study
  • Module 4: Housing Fact Sheets/Backgrounder

DESCRIPTION

Family Studies (EDCP 494) is one of a series of online special study courses designed to provide background knowledge for teachers of home economics or for those considering teaching home economics as a career.

Family Studies involves examining family life and issues from a variety of perspectives. This course will focus on the major topics taught in Family Studies in secondary schools: human growth and development; families in society; family and interpersonal relationships; parenting; and housing and living environments. The goal of this online course is to provide background information and knowledge in Family Studies for current or potential teachers of home economics.

OBJECTIVES

  • To become familiar with terminology related to the study of families
  • To become familiar with current trends and issues facing families
  • To evaluate and apply theoretical frameworks used in the study of families

OUTLINE

 Module 1: Human Growth and Development and the Dynamics of Family Life (5 Weeks)
  • Child Development and Parenting
  • Adolescence
  • Adulthood
Module 2: Families in Society (3 Weeks)
  • Defining and Conceptualizing Families
  • Canadian Families
  • Issues Facing Families
Module 3: Interpersonal and Family Relationships (2 Weeks)
  • Communication, Intimacy and Commitment
  • Relationship Breakdown, Divorce, Remarriage
Module 4: Housing and Living Environments (2 weeks)
  • Housing Options for Canadian Families
  • Homelessness and Housing Issues in Canada
  • Creating Living Environments

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Baker, Maureen. Families Changing Trends in Canada, 6th Edition. Toronto, ON: McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 2009. ISBN: 9780070968868

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Curriculum Inquiry in Home Economics

EDCP 498 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

(Equivalency: EDCP 495B)

EVALUATION

  • Reading Responses and Discussion
  • Completing Assignments in the Inquiry Workbook
  • Collaborative Analysis of a Critical Incident

Module Assignments:

  • Module 2 – Drafting a Research Plan
  • Module 3 – Writing a Home Economics Related Life History/Autobiography
  • Module 4 – Conducting Historical Research
  • Module 5 – Analyzing a Teaching Resource for Home Economics

DESCRIPTION

Culminating inquiry in curriculum and pedagogy for the Home Economics Education Diploma. (UBC Calendar)

This online course is designed as a culminating inquiry in curriculum and pedagogy for Diploma in Education – Home Economics Education students. It may also be of interest to current Home Economics Teacher Education and Home Economics Education Master students.

The goal of this online course is to provide opportunities for teachers to explore various methods of curriculum inquiry for the ways they can assist us in understanding and improving our professional practice as home economics educators.

OBJECTIVES

  • To encourage teachers to use various modes of inquiry as part of reflective practice and teacher professional development.
  • To use action research, narrative inquiry, historical inquiry and curriculum analysis to gain a better understanding of curriculum and pedagogy in home economics education.

OUTLINE

The course is divided into six modules or units with each unit having an introduction, readings and assignments. Students will participate in weekly discussions and group work. Students are expected to come online two to three times per week and put in the same amount of time commitment as for an on-campus course.  Discussion questions are organized in an inquiry workbook format.

MODULE TOPIC
1 Setting the Context (2 weeks)
2 Teaching in an Inquiry Mode (2 weeks)
3 Narrative Inquiry – Examining Our Stories (3 weeks)
4 Introduction to Historical Inquiry – How the Past Influences the Present (3 weeks)
5 Curriculum Analysis – What Values and Beliefs Underpin Contemporary Curriculum Documents (2 weeks)
6 Final Reflections (1 week)

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Course readings are available through Library Course reserves two weeks before the course start date.

There is no textbook required.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No HMED course(s) were found for W2017 term.

Administration of the School Library Resource Centre

LIBE 461 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • 6 web-based assignments;
  • Analysis of a School Library Resource Centre Program
  • Plan of Action
  • Participation

DESCRIPTION

This online course introduces students to the exciting and evolving role of the School Library Learning Commons (SLLC) in today’s K-12 environment, within a Canadian context, including other facilities or spaces that support teaching and learning of curriculum and student literacy development, such as community libraries.  Students will develop an understanding of the role and philosophy of the SLLC as it relates to a school’s instructional programs. In a series of modules, students will explore the range of issues and policies that teacher-librarians must address in order to create a dynamic, information-rich, multi-literacy resource centre that draws in teachers and students alike.  Included among the topics covered: policy, image, budget, resource selection, personnel, co-planning/co-teaching, facilities, and technology integration. Concepts introduced in this course will be expanded upon in subsequent course work, equipping the participants to be effective educational leaders in their School Library Learning Commons.

OUTLINE

  1. Redefining the space and the practitioner (SLLC and TL)
  2. School libraries in the wider library context (public, academic, community)
  3. Crafting Your Policy
  4. Your Clientele: Staff, Students and Administrators
  5. What’s My Image?
  6. How to Manage a Budget
  7. Dealing with the Resources
  8. Personnel & Facilities: some thoughts
  9. Tackling the Technology Challenge
  10. Leadership and Pro-D

OBJECTIVES

  • To introduce students to the philosophy, role and administration of school library resource centres in elementary and secondary schools.
  • To develop an understanding of the educational role of the school library resource centre as an integrated and integral component of the school curriculum.
  • To examine school library policies and procedures within the Canadian context.
  • To develop an awareness of the importance of the role of the teacher-librarian and to gain knowledge of the many facets of that role.
  • To develop an understanding of how to administer and operate a school library.
  • To provide participants with an opportunity to use newly emerging technologies in a learning situation.
  • To provide participants with an opportunity to develop specific plans of action that applies the course content and discussions to their personal school context.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Selection of Learning Resources

LIBE 463 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • There is no exam
  • On-going written dialogue and commenting
  • Assignment 1: Community Analysis and Report
  • Assignment 2: Collection Evaluation Report
  • Assignment 3: Weeding Project and Report

DESCRIPTION

This online course is an introduction to the theory and practice of collection management (including collection evaluation, weeding and selection of resources) in school libraries. Issues related to copyright, intellectual freedom, curriculum support, and recreational reading will also be covered.

OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand and state the importance of the library collection and appropriate selection practices in relation to the overall effectiveness of a school library program
  • Establish procedures and practices for collection development in a school library setting
  • Assess school and community needs as they relate to collection development.
  • Understand and apply accepted principles of selection to the acquisition of school library resources.
  • Select print, non-print and digital resources for a school library using accepted selection practices.
  • Choose and employ standard and accepted selection aids.
  • Weed the school library collection using accepted practices.
  • Understand the importance of complying with copyright provisions and apply these provisions to collection development decisions.
  • Understand and discuss issues related to intellectual freedom as they relate to the school library collection.
  • Explore new formats, models and opportunities for a school library collection.
  • Connect with and meet local, district, provincial and national expectations for library services, collections and directions.
  • Understand challenges and opportunities for struggling libraries around the world and develop connections and strategies for assisting and sharing with global communities.

OUTLINE

THEME TOPIC
Introduction and Getting Started Concepts and Definitions in Collection Management
Community Analysis Assessing the Needs of Your School Community
Evaluating Your Collection Evaluation and Criteria
Issues in Collection Management Policies and Policy-making
Intellectual Freedom and Censorship
Curriculum Support and Recreational Reading
Weeding the Collection Weeding
Maintenance and Preservation
Acquiring Resources for Your School Library Selection of Materials
Selection Tools
Budgeting
Further Issues and Conclusions Access
Copyright

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Bishop, Kay. The Collection Program in Schools Concepts and Practices Fifth Edition. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited, 2012. ISBN:   9781610690225

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Organization of Learning Resources

LIBE 465 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Three major assignments:

  • Participation in online discussion forum
  • Community of Practice Inquiry Reflection Blog Journal
  • Final Research Project

DESCRIPTION

The organization, classification and cataloguing of school library resource centre materials. The online course is designed to prepare students in the overall information organization of school libraries, including bibliographic control, metadata and cataloguing of school library resource centre materials as well as emerging digital learning technologies.

OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this online course students will be able to:

  • Identify how information organization relates to the overall role of the teacher-librarian and how this will support student learning.
  • Acknowledge the importance of bibliographic control, standards and taxonomies in the school library resource centre and apply these in a school setting.
  • Communicate the importance of the knowledge organization of the school library resource centre to administrators, teachers and students.
  • Identify and apply various Internet and open access resources that support the organization of learning resources.
  • Utilize practical applications of cataloguing and classification and be aware of strategies that will help to expedite these processes.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the important role of automated library systems in the operations of the school library and how this supports “best access” to resources and student learning.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: December 23, 2016


Information Services

LIBE 467 (3.0) Online Course Outline

EVALUATION

There are three major assignments that will comprise your Collection Development e-portfolio.

  • Evaluation and Replacement of a Reference Work
  • Collaboratively Planned Unit supporting an evolving educator
  • Evaluation Plan for improving your Reference Services and Section

Students will also maintain a blog where they will reflect each other of the three themes, as well as publish their three major assignments. Students will participate in small group peer feedback on their blog posts. (UBC Calendar)

DESCRIPTION

The goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and understanding of a variety of K-12 reference materials and services and the instructional support necessary to make these an important component of the school library program.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Evaluate, select and manage print and electronic reference materials.
  • Recognize and recommend those reference materials and resources required to meet the needs of students and staff.
  • Provide effective instructional practices that support student and staff use of references.
  • Use reference materials to support curriculum topics through collaborative planning and teaching.
  • Integrate the utilization of reference materials with the goals of information literacy.

OUTLINE

LESSON TOPIC
1 Information Literacy and Reference Services in Schools
2 The Reference Process and Information Skills
3 Building a Reference Collection for your School Library
4 Print / Non-print: Benefits of Various Reference Formats and Considerations for Selection
5 Information Services and Cooperative Program Planning and Teaching
6 Dictionaries, General and Special Encyclopedias
7 Thesauri, Handbooks, Almanacs and Yearbooks
8 Indexes, Abstracts and Full-text Databases
9 Maps, Atlases and other Geographical Sources
10 Bibliographies, Biographies, Directories and The Library Catalogue
11 Grey Literature, the World Wide Web and the Deep
12 Managing the Reference Collection

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-4742, or toll-free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or
Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Riedling, Ann. Reference Skills for the School Library Media Specialist: Tools and Tips, 3rd Linworth Publishers. (2013) ISBN: 9781586835286

Students should also have access to:

  • Asselin, M., Branch, J., & Oberg, D., (Eds). (2003) Achieving information literacy: Standards for school library programs in Canada. Ottawa, ON: Canadian School Library Association & The Association for Teacher-Librarianship in Canada. http://www.accessola2.com/SLIC-Site/slic/ail110217.pdf
  • Canadian Libraries Association. Leading Learning: Standards of Practice for School Library Learning Commons in Canada. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Libraries Association http://llsop.canadianschoollibraries.ca/
  • A school or community library collection to complete the assignments for this course.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Special Topics in Teacher Librarianship – New Media and New Technologies in the School Library Program

LIBE 477B (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • There is no exam.
  • Reading Assignment
  • Inquiry Project – Weekly Blog Posts
  • Vision of Your Future Library/Classroom
  • Discussions/Community Participation

DESCRIPTION

In depth study of selected topics in library education (UBC Calendar)

This course will introduce digital media and technologies to enable personal and social learning and communication. The course is situated in the context of contemporary library studies, serving schools whose programs focus on: a) building a culture of reading, and b) learning inquiry skills to examine online information resources. Students will learn to implement these components of the library program within a conceptual framework of the pedagogical uses of digital technologies and media for learning.

The course focuses on three areas of interest:

  1. Exploring topics pertinent to librarianship, digital technologies, and life in the knowledge age.
  2. Developing technological skills and knowledge about digital technologies and resources that support innovative learning experiences: for example, mobile devices, tablets, cloud computing, application software, social media, open education resources, personal learning networks, content aggregators, asynchronous discussion forums, web conferencing software, video editing applications and annotation tools.
  3. Synthesizing inquiry topics and digital skills and knowledge to design relevant learning resources for use in local teaching contexts.

In addition, the course introduces technological and digital discrepancies between libraries serving schools in developed and developing countries. Creative approaches with technologies to improve library services will be explored.

Students will have extensive opportunities to engage in learning technologies while stressing inquiry, criticality and creative thinking. The learning activities and assignments in this course are designed to be unique to this course while relating to, and building on, other core courses in the teacher librarian diploma program.

OBJECTIVES

Students will investigate the application of online resources, activities and concepts to enhance and facilitate the:

  • Integration of information literacy within innovative pedagogical practice.
  • Transformation of the traditional role of the library from an information repository to a physical and digital environment characterized as an active learning laboratory, a learning commons.
  • Co-creation of a social constructivist learning environment and the democratizing of information access through social networking and social publishing, allowing patrons to be publishers and librarians to be social knowledge curators.
  • Construction of knowledge and development of teaching philosophies incorporating course readings, personal reflection and social participation.
  • Exploration of emerging technologies, strategies and resources that will enhance and extend school libraries into interactive, service-oriented, community building entities that support the development of personal learning networks.

OUTLINE

Students enrolled in this online course are considered important participants in the learning group.

It is expected that participants in the learning group for this online course will bring diverse histories of experience and confidence with digital technologies and learning activities. It is expected that those with knowledge of certain skills and topics will assist and support those in the community that need help. It is also expected that members of the learning group will dedicate considerable time to self-directed learning as well as sharing this learning with other members. Self-directed learning includes research into philosophical, curricular and pedagogical topics pertaining to ICT in education and school libraries, as well as developing explorative technological dispositions for learning a variety of web-based applications and online interactive settings. Inquiry is a critical part of learning in this course and students are encouraged to enter into new learning activities with an open mind and a collaborative sense of adventure!

This online course is a guided process for developing intellectual knowledge about digital technologies and their uses in education in concert with hands-on learning activities. The course content will be co-created by contributions from the learning group throughout the term as a consequence of engaging with readings, online discussions, weekly hangouts, and publishing blog posts. This co-creation of knowledge and content will be guided by the instructor and will allow the learners in the course to customize their learning to meet their needs, and the needs of building sophisticated knowledge of digital technologies in the field of teacher-librarianship. Students can expect to spend at least 9 hours per week on course readings, inquiry, online discussions and publishing blog posts. Assignment preparation will likely entail additional time. The course website will guide you by providing information, structure, instructions, assignments and interactive connectivity with the learning group.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

The ebook, Why School? How Education Must Change When Learning and Information are Everywhere by Will Richardson, should be ordered using the following URL:

https://www.amazon.ca/Why-School-Education-Information-Everywhere-ebook/dp/B00998J5YQ

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No LIBE course(s) were found for W2017 term.

Theory and Practice in Reading Instruction: Learning to Read in an Online World

LLED 391 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Reflection on personal reading experiences and writing self-portrait in an online world
Assignment 2: In-depth exploration of a topic from the course outline
Assignment 3: Answers to six questions from the course modules
Assignment 4: Discussion contributions

DESCRIPTION

This online course is designed for students finishing a first degree, for those enrolled in a diploma program, for those completing qualifying courses for admission to a Master’s program, and for teachers seeking a greater understanding of reading and literacy theory and practices in elementary reading education in today’s online world. The focus of the course is on beginning or early reading and literacy instruction.

OBJECTIVES

  • Learn about current thought and research in the language processes and their implications for reading instruction in an online world
  • Think critically about these theories
  • Develop an understanding of the interrelation between reading theory and practice in an online world
  • Develop practical strategies for teaching reading in our online world

OUTLINE

  • Introduction to the teaching of reading in an online world
  • Teaching reading in an online world: approaches and strategies
  • The beginning of literacy in an online world
  • Assessing reading performance
  • Word identification and reading fluency
  • Reading comprehension in an online world
  • Reading-writing connections
  • Reading materials: from basals to children’s literature
  • Making the transition to content area texts
  • Meeting the literacy needs of diverse learners
  • Organizing an effective classroom
  • Course summary and reflection

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Gramligne: Learning and Teaching Grammar in Text for the Second Language Classroom

LLED 421 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • A written text for each module: narrative, descriptive, informative, injunctive, argumentative and direct and indirect discourse
  • Participation by doing the activities on the website and providing ideas of resources
  • On-line discussion
  • One text grammar mini-unit on one linguistic pattern

DESCRIPTION

This online course is taught entirely in French. This is not a course for beginners of French.

The purpose of this online course is to help French as second language teachers to improve their linguistic and metalinguistic knowledge in French as well as their pedagogy in grammar teaching through a reflexive process of guided observation and analysis of language discourse in authentic texts corresponding to different functions of language (i.e., past tense related to narration). They will also learn how to teach text grammar with the same process in their classroom. A secondary objective is for teachers to collect resources to teach French in their classroom.

Anyone who is admissible to UBC can register for credit in this online course. Students must be fluent in French as the course is entirely in French and at a high level. There are two levels, Intermediate and Advanced, which correspond to the core French students and French immersion students. This course is for students who are fluent in French but need to work on their accuracy and understanding of linguistic structures as they serve as tools to communicate. It is also a course that teaches future or current teachers of French how to teach grammar in a communicative way from the observation of texts. At the same time, students learn about grammatical rules in French needed to communicate with accuracy.

OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  1. Become familiar with the latest research on grammar teaching in second language classrooms.
  2. Understand and recognize the communicative functions of texts (narrative, descriptive, informative, injunctive and argumentative) and the linguistic patterns associated with those functions.
  3. Understand the rules of usage of the linguistic patterns corresponding to each type of text through guided observation and deduction.
  4. Apply their understanding and knowledge of the linguistic patterns in communicative games or short messages.
  5. Practice writing texts with various communicative functions using the linguistic patterns necessary to these communications.
  6. Prepare lessons to teach text grammar in the classroom.
  7. Understand how to search and collect resources that will help teach language in the classroom.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: December 23, 2016


Language Assessment in the French as a Second/Additional Language Classroom

LLED 422 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • A summary of a research article on assessment
  • Assessment of grammar
  • Participation weekly by answering directed questions, commenting on on-line discussions and preparing assigned reading
  • Assessment of listening, speaking, reading and writing

DESCRIPTION

This online course is taught entirely in French.  This is not a course for beginners of French.

Prerequisite:  A completed concentration or major in French or permission of Department Head.

This online course is designed to give educators an opportunity to both confirm and extend their learning with regard to second language assessment practices. In addition, the goal of this course is to further knowledge in developing effective and fair assessment practices due to the significant impact it has on student learning. This course will provide a framework for thinking about the purposes of classroom assessment (assessment as, for and of learning), and for creating and implementing changes to assessment practices that are consistent with enhancing learning for all students. It will also provide educators with starting points for reflection and discussion based on recent assessment research. The course is premised on the belief that assessment has various purposes and that it is important to design and use classroom assessment methods to serve the intended purposes. Educators will study various guiding principles of second language assessment and will explore ways to put theory into practice. Several assessment methods will be presented which educators will be able to implement in their respective classrooms.

OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  1. Understand why assessment is the foreground of educational initiatives.
  2. Discuss the evolution of assessment, its challenges and the importance for educators to understand the changes in second language assessment and the implications of those changes in evaluation practices.
  3. Learn the elements of language abilities according to Bachman and Palmer (2010).
  4. Discuss the concept of test usefulness (according to Bachman and Palmer, 1996) depending on the goal and context of second language assessment.
  5. Familiarize themselves with the principles which guide second language assessment practices according to three essential objectives to develop and implement assessment tools in the classroom: assessment for learning, assessment as learning, and assessment of learning).
  6. Familiarize themselves with second language tests according to their level of reliability, validity, authenticity, interaction, impact (washback) and practicality.
  7. Learn the stages and conceptual bases in the development of second language proficiency tests in relation to listening, oral, reading, writing, grammar and vocabulary skills.
  8. Learn to evaluate second language tests according to the level of reliability, validity, authenticity, interaction, impact (washback) and practicality based on Bachman and Palmer’s (1996) conceptual view.
  9. Explore alternative methods of second language assessment and communication used in research and in the classroom such as the oral interview, portfolio, journal, conference, observation, peer evaluation and self-evaluation, and use of computers.
  10. Explore various methods of data collection of assessment to help classroom teaching.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order: 604-822-2665, or toll-free in North America: 1 800-661-3889 or

Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Brown, H. Douglas and Abeywickrama, Priyanvada. Language Assessment Principles and Classroom Practices Second Edition. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education, 2010. ISBN: 9780138149314
  • Davies, Anne. L’évaluation en cours d’apprentissage. (2nd ed.).  Montréal, Canada: Chenelière Éducation, 2007. ISBN: 9782765018001

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: December 23, 2016


Introduction to Teaching Children’s Literature

LLED 441 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Reading Autobiography or a Personal Definition of Children’s Literature
  • A bibliography of 15 books or personal canon that fits your teaching environment
  • Four, two-page long written responses to questions through the course
  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Discussion Forum Participation

DESCRIPTION

This online course is an opportunity to study children’s literature as a resource for developing multi-literacies across the curriculum. The multimodal forms of literature offer content and inspiration for transformative activities and reflective thinking that serve students literacy and literary development needs. Assignments include multimodal responses to key issues such as the purpose and value of a literary canon, the creation of community canons that serve particular student populations, popular sequential visual narrative forms, and literature as a resource for developing empathy and motivating social action.

This online course explores the use of children’s literature in the classroom and elaborates on ways to use literary experiences to support instructional goals. During the course you will develop response activities employing multi-literacies and multimodal resources to use in teaching literature to students K-12. For this course, students will be asked to read material in each of the modules and from a selection of children’s literature, practical and scholarly articles about children’s literature, and current book reviews. This course aims to promote awareness and acceptance of diversity, our own and that of our peers, students and that of the creators of children’s literature.

OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course you will have explored through class discussions, written discourse and other response modalities the following questions:

  • What is children’s literature?
  • What is a canon of children’s literature? A modern canon? A canon for a particular socio/cultural context?
  • What theoretical frameworks support the study of children’s literature?
  • How can the study of children’s literature contribute to education?
  • What is a book? What are its forms and genres?
  • What is a sequential visual narrative?
  • What are other multimodal forms of children’s literature?
  • What criteria should be used for selecting children’s literature?
  • What transformative activities contribute to students’ literacy and literary development across the curriculum?

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 A Snapshot History of Childhood
2 A Snapshot History of Children’s Literature in the Classroom
3 A Snapshot of a Theory of Language, Children’s Early Language Development, Multimodality and the Forms of Literature
4 Context, Canon and Grand Conversations
5 The Poetics of Children’s Literature: What makes a piece of literature literary?
6 Sequential Visual Narrative Forms: Wordless Books and Picture Books
7 Sequential Visual Narrative Forms: Comics, Graphic Novels and Animations
8 Easy Reader, Chapter Books and Other Forms and Formats
9 Information and Concept Literature
10 Multimodal Response to Literature across the Curriculum
11 Canadian Children’s Literature
12 Children’s Book Creators in the Classroom
13 Troubling Tellings: Indigenous Literature

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required. All Readings are related to assignments and featured topics. Each of the thirteen modules contains in depth articles, questions, activities, videos, bibliographies and links to resources in support of course topics.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Teaching with Illustrated Materials, K-12: From Picture Books to Information Texts

LLED 446 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1:  A Glossary of fifty key terms to define
Assignment 2:  Ten key questions on illustrated materials
Assignment 3:  Creation of a set of classroom resources or a 2000 word paper
Assignment 4:  An annotated Bibliography of key illustrated texts read for the course

DESCRIPTION

This online course explores the use of illustrated children’s materials in K-12 classrooms with particular attention given to the role of the visual modality in conveying narrative and concept information to readers. Also, this course explores the ways that illustrated materials support the instructional goals for the education of K-12 students. This course aims to promote awareness and acceptance of diversity, our own, of our peers, students and that of the creators of illustrated literary texts.

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 Illustrated Literature – Multimodal texts
2 The Role of Modality
3 Wordless / Silent Books
4 Spare Texts – what are those gaps?
5 A language for expressing what image and illustration do
6 A theory of narrative for sequential visual narrative forms
7 Picture Books – challenging and controversial books and why we need them
8 Denotative vs connotative illustrated books
9 Playful, metafictive postmodern books
10 Hybrid picture books and the rise of graphic novels
11 Graphic novels for every age – fiction and non-fiction
12 Illustrated Information Books
13 Illustrated Information

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Disciplinary Literacies: Intermediate through Secondary

LLED 452 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: An introductory evaluation or taking stock
Assignment 2: An in-depth exploration of a single course topic
Assignment 3: Answers to any six module questions
Assignment 4: Discussion contributions

OBJECTIVES

The objective of this online course is to provide the participant with knowledge of instructional strategies and possibilities of teaching content area material in today’s diverse classroom settings.

As a participant you will:

  1. Develop an understanding of the special challenges which cultural, linguistic and achievement differences create in today’s classrooms and explore the ways in which these impact on content area reading.
  2. Learn how to integrate electronic texts and trade books into the curriculum.
  3. Learn how to make authentic assessments through the use of standardized and naturalistic approaches as well as through portfolio to assessment.
  4. Develop strategies to teach core text lessons and thematic units through the adoption of an inquiry/research focus.
  5. Learn how to integrate reading, talking and writing to learn through the study of vocabulary and concepts; prior knowledge and interest, study strategies and study guides.

OUTLINE

Part 1: Literacy and Learning in Today’s Classrooms
Module 1 Literacy Matters
Module 2 Learning with New Literacies
Module 3 Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners
Module 4 Assessing Students and Texts
Part 2: Instructional Practices and Strategies
Module 5 Planning Instruction for Content Literacy
Module 6 Activating Prior Knowledge and Interest
Module 7 Guiding Reading Comprehensions
Module 8 Developing Vocabulary and Concepts
Module 9 Writing Across the Curriculum
Module 10 Study Strategies and Guides
Part 3: Teaching and Learning Beyond the Textbook
Module 11 Learning with Tradebooks
Module 12 Looking Back, Looking Forward

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Trends and Issues in Literacy Instruction

LLED 459 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1:   An introductory evaluation or taking stock
Assignment 2:   Responses to course readings in six different modules
Assignment 3:   An in-depth exploration of a course topic of interest
Assignment 4:   Discussion component

DESCRIPTION

Prerequisite: An introductory-level reading or language arts education course.

Current trends in comprehension instruction and multi-literacies. LLED 459 is a core course for the Language and Literacy Education Diploma.

OBJECTIVES

  1. Develop an understanding of the interrelation amongst technology, literacy theory, research and practice.
  2. Expand and re-evaluate your knowledge of current thinking and research in literacy theory and practice and consequent implications for literacy instruction in a variety of classrooms.
  3. Develop an understanding of how beginning literacy theory and practice relates to adult literacy, ESL reading and Web 2.0 technology.
  4. Have an opportunity to think critically and creatively about implications of these theories and practices for your own teaching.

OUTLINE

  1. Taking stock of literacy: our beliefs
  2. New technologies for new learners
  3. Multi-literacies: engaging students with and through reading
  4. Critical literacy
  5. Teaching with and through literature
  6. Reading in a new key: comics, graphic novels and e-readers
  7. Composing and writing, Part One
  8. Composing and writing, Part Two
  9. Diverse cultures
  10. Barriers to literacy: several learner-centred approaches
  11. Assessment
  12. Looking forward

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


School Library Resource Centre Programs

LLED 462 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Librarians as Educational Leaders: Learning Curation

Term Assignment:

Assignment 2: Libraries as Centres for Literacy or
Assignment 3: Libraries as Spaces of Learning Discussion

Forum/Participation: Creating a Network of Learners

DESCRIPTION

The focus of this online course is the school library program – aspects about how it supports literacies, in their many forms, and the broader school curriculum as well as how it functions within a community of learners.

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 Introduction
2 School Libraries as Places of Literacy and Learning
3 Supporting Learners through the Library: Cultivating Life-long Reading Habits
4 Learning from Multi-Modal Texts: A Look at New Literacies
5 Supporting Learners through the Library: Critical Literacy
6 Supporting Learners through the Library: Digital and Media Literacy
7 The Teacher-Librarian as Educational Leader: Supporting Networks and Partnerships in the Library
8 Supporting Literacy with Learning Technologies: Web Tools.
9 Supporting Learners as Inquirers and Designers
10 Supporting Diverse Learners and Creating Opportunities in the Library
11 Beyond Library Walls: Working for Social Justice in the School Library
12 Leading the Way to the Future: New Perspectives and Advocacy for Teacher-Librarians
13 Summation

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

There is no textbook required.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


Resource-based Teaching

LLED 469 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

Assignment 1: Learners as inquirers: Learning Curation
Assignment 2: Inquiry: cultivating mindsets and gathering tools
Assignment 3: Inquiry: design and implementation
Discussion Forum: Nurturing a culture of inquiry

DESCRIPTION

Inquiry, supported by a wide range of resources accessed with the support of the teacher-librarian, is foundational to a strong, dynamic and responsive school library program. The inquiry approach, when activated by teachers working collaboratively with the teacher-librarian, enhances both teaching and learning and enables students to move to independent and lifelong reading and learning.

In this online course, students will design inquiry-based learning experiences by:

  1. appropriate resources;
  2. incorporating strategies for assessment of and for learning; and
  3. a variety of instructional tools, strategies and technologies to design resource-based inquiry learning opportunities

OUTLINE

MODULE TOPIC
1 Introduction
2 Roles of the School Library: standards of practice and cultivating an “inquiry-ready” environment
3&4 Inquiry: models, mindsets and broad-based understandings; Inquiry: designing for inquiry
5 Collaborative Program Planning and Teaching: a look at collaborative inquiry
6&7 Context Matters: Resource-based: Teaching: selecting/evaluating tools that meet the needs of diverse learners and integrating effective technologies
8 Curriculum Conversations: content curation
9 Curriculum Conversations: planning with the four Literacies: information, critical, digital and media
10 Curriculum Conversations: assessment
11 Curriculum Conversations: First People’s principles of learning and global perspectives
12 Learner Agency: co-construction and nurturing student voice
13 Summation

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

There is no required textbook for this course.

Required Reading:

Readings and resources needed for the course can be found in the Library Course Reserves section of Connect.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


The Education of Immigrant Students

LLED 479 (3.0) Online – Course Outline

EVALUATION

  • Educational Culture Study
  • Critique of Five Articles
  • Critique of Ten Strategies for Teaching ESL/EAL Learners
  • Participation on the Online Discussion Board

DESCRIPTION

An examination of the cultural backgrounds of major ethnic groups. Instructional techniques for meeting the needs of immigrant students in the grade level classroom with respect to culture and language. (UBC Calendar)

OBJECTIVES

The central objectives of this online course are:

  • to develop an understanding of the meaning of cultural diversity and multicultural education in the context of today’s schools;
  • to become knowledgeable about some of the issues surrounding the historical, socio-political, psychological and linguistic backgrounds of immigrant and multicultural students;
  • to explore appropriate teaching techniques and strategies for multicultural classrooms;
  • to gain knowledge about appropriate and relevant resources and materials;
  • to consider the appropriateness and possible uses of resources and materials for a multicultural and multilingual context.

OUTLINE

  1. Setting the Context: ESL/EAL Learners in Every Classroom
  2. Culture and Communication in the Classroom
  3. “Isms”:  Race, Ethnocentricity, Stereotypes and other Frames of Reference
  4. Language and Identity
  5. Roles and Responsibilities
  6. Starting with the End in Mind: Assessment and ESL/EAL Learners
  7. Integrating Language and Content Instruction
  8. Vocabulary and Language Development
  9. Representations of Learning
  10. Reading and Reading in the Content Areas
  11. Writing and Writing across the Curriculum
  12. ESL “Special” Learners
  13. Looking Forward; Looking Back

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIAL

Call the UBC Bookstore to order:  604-822-2665, or toll free in North America: 1-800-661-3889 or
Order online: http://shop.bookstore.ubc.ca/courselistbuilder.aspx

  • Helmer, S. & Eddy, C. (2012). Look at Me When I Talk to You: EAL Learners in Non-EAL Classrooms. (3rd edition). Hardcover. Pippin Publishing Corporation. ISBN: 9780887511226
  • Herrell,  A.L.,  &  Jordan,  M.  (2015).  Fifty Strategies for Teaching English  Language  Learners. (5th edition). Boston,  MA: Pearson. ISBN: 9780133802450

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This is an online course. Students are required to have a computer, access to the Internet, and a Campus Wide Login ID and password to access the course website.

LIBRARY RESOURCES: Connect From Home

Your EZproxy connection will allow you to access library resources from your computer on or off campus. For more information, go to http://services.library.ubc.ca/off-campus-access/connect-from-home/

MORE INFORMATION

Telephone: 604-822-2013, or toll-free in North America: 1-888-492-1122
Email: pro-d.educ@ubc.ca


Latest Revision on: March 22, 2017


UBC Calendar Course Title Course Outlines Credits
Online Courses Outline

Show Calendar Details

Winter 2017
No LLED course(s) were found for W2017 term.

LLED Course Waitlists

Due to the demand for our courses we have a waitlist for classes that are full. Please sign up for the waitlist section of the course.
For wait-listed students please note the following:
  1. Please be aware that registration is blocked once courses are full, which prevents everyone from registering. If your registration is blocked, please check to see if the course is full, and then sign up for the waitlist section of the course.
  2. The waitlist works on a priority basis; if seats become available they are given to students who are registered in the following programs: (a) DEDU LIBE, (b) DEDU LLED, and (c) EDUC Certificate LIBE. This is followed by students outside of these programs by registration date.
  3. Students will be moved into the class automatically as seats become available. Please check the SSC to confirm your registration.
  4. We will be moving in students off the waitlist and into the course once per day. If you see a space available in the course that means we have either not moved in students today, or that someone has dropped the course after we have moved in students and that seat will not be assigned until the next day.
  5. In most cases waitlists will continue to be active and will be monitored up to the last day to withdraw without a W standing for the term. The waitlist will be deleted after this date.
  6. If you have any further questions please contact pro-d.educ@ubc.ca.

UBC’s Faculty of Education also offers flexible delivery options for a number of diploma and certificate programs.